89% of ICO to be Unprofitable, Analyst Says

According to the director of research at The Block, IEO are starting to repeat ICO's trend
08 August 2019   2656

Leading analyst of The Block, Larry Cermak, decided to analyze the profitability of ICO projects and found that at least 89% of them turned out to be unprofitable. Nevertheless, those that showed positive returns “win big.”

Cermak praised the development of the ICO market, which peaked in 2017. He noted that the median ICO return in US dollars is currently -87% and continues to fall.

In his opinion, the collapse of the ICO market is primarily due to the different interests of investors and project founders. Unlike venture financing, projects raised money mainly from retail investors with the product in its earliest stages. At the same time, investors could not claim the assets of ICO projects.

The data on the total collection of ICO projects for all time varies - ICOBench claims that 5600 startups raised $ 64.5 billion, but other resources provide completely different data - up to $ 14 billion.

Assessing the profitability of ICOs is even more difficult, since many projects have already ceased to exist or their tokens are illiquid.

The largest aggregate fees were recorded in December 2017 - January 2018. At that time, a record number of tokensales was held.

The average amount attracted during one initial proposal according to a sample of 444 projects at Drops ICO is $ 36.2 million, the median - $ 18 million. In general, they raised about $ 14 billion, Cermak notes.

At the same time, only 10.8% of all ICOs still show a positive return, based on available data.

More than 74% of ICOs lost more than 90% in relation to bitcoin. Only 30 projects (7.7%) managed to surpass the first cryptocurrency. The top five ICOs in terms of growth in bitcoin included Binance Coin (5902%), IOTA (1744%), Ethereum (1339%), Lambda (962%) and ChainLink (668%).

In terms of the US dollar, the most profitable were Ethereum, IOTA, Binance Coin, NEO and Stellar.

In total, 11 projects demonstrated returns above 1000% paired with USD.

Malaysia to Regulate ICO and IEO

Rules says tokens can be distributed via venture capitalists and financial institutions without selling shares and without debt instruments
16 January 2020   109

In Malaysia, the procedure for initial coin offerings (ICO) and initial exchange offerings (IEO) has been established. The Malaysia Securities and Exchange Commission (SC) provided relevant guidance for participants in the digital asset industry.

According to the regulator, projects can distribute their tokens through venture capitalists and financial institutions without selling shares and without using debt instruments. It was also established the maximum limit on the amount of funds raised through ICO, which will be 100 million Malaysian ringgit or about $ 24.5 million. No special requirements for investors are provided, that is, both institutional and retail investors will be able to participate in such campaigns.

After the completion of sales, the regulator will monitor the spending of collected funds.

Digital tokens offering can provide another alternative fundraising avenue for early-stage entrepreneurs. This initiative supports Malaysia’s Shared Prosperity Vision 2030 (SPV2030) by supporting the growth of SMEs and micro businesses which are targeted to contribute 50% to Malaysia’s GDP. It also aligned with SPV2030’s aspiration to create 30% high technology Malaysian companies.

 

Datuk Syed Zaid Albar

Chairman of the SC

In addition, the rules for the functioning of IEO platforms were established. Such platforms, if they operate in the country, must independently register with the agency. In addition, they must carry out the necessary checks to verify the integrity of the issuer, as well as understand the capabilities and characteristics of the token they offer.

New regulations are expected to be established in Malaysia in the second half of this year. At the first stage, SC intends to cooperate with IEO platforms on the issue of identifying satisfactory issuers.