Almost $16,000 stolen at Ethereum wallet attack

Myetherwallet.com attacked by hackers sending phishing emails, but criminals quickly unveiled by ethical hacking expert 
26 October 2017   969

The phishing campaign was uncovered by Wesley Neelen, a Dutch IT infrastructures security researcher, who has worked as an ethical hacker in several organizations for 6 years. He received an email from the criminals to his unique email address, known only by a limited mailing list, and decided to investigate this further. The malicious link in the email led to a fake version of the Myetherwallet.com website. Little did cybercriminals know that they targeted a hacking expert.

Those who clicked the link were given the information about the upcoming Ethereum hard fork and asked to enter their private keys to unlock their accounts. The private keys and passwords were later used by hackers to steal all the coins from victims’ wallets.

Wesley Neelen stated that although the fake website was designed to look exactly like the original site, he noticed that the address of a fake website contained a small comma beneath the “t”, and the cybercriminals used a Unicode trick to register such domains.

Neelen found out that a certain people have already fallen victim to the scam as he found a file that contained a list of all the wallets stolen by the hackers.

The total amount stolen was determined by security experts as $15,875.65 in Ethereum which hackers were able to withdraw from the accounts in only two hours.

'Kodak Miner' Turned Out to be a Scam

KashMiner by Spotlite USA was promoted as Kodak branded bitcoin miner 
17 July 2018   137

The KashMiner bitcoin miner, exhibited at the Kodak stand during the CES technology show in Las Vegas, was in fact a product designed to mislead potential consumers and with a potentially unattainable potential return. This is reported by BBC.

Spotlite USA is licensed by Kodak's lighting division, which allows it to use the famous brand in its products. In January 2018 the company introduced its miner and announced that it intends to lease it. According to its business plan, potential users had to pay a commission before getting the device. It was expected that after depositing $ 3,400, the customer will receive a device that will allow him to easily cover expenses and receive revenue from bitcoin mining.

However the company did not have an official Kodak license to use the brand in the production of mining equipment and initially overstated the indicators of the potential profit of its device, refusing to take into account the growing complexity and costs of bitcoin mining. The advertising materials reported that KashMiner brings $ 375 a month, which, subject to a 2-year contract, would allow the client to receive $ 5,600 of profit after paying a commission. Experts from the industry of cryptocurrency call this offer a scam.

There is no way your magical Kodak miner will make the same $375 every month.
 

Saifedean Ammous

Economist

CEO Spotlite USA Halston Mikail previously reported that he plans to install hundreds of miners at the headquarters of Kodak. According to him, he already managed to place 80 miners there, but the Kodak spokesman denied this information.

While you saw units at CES from our licensee Spotlite, the KashMiner is not a Kodak brand licensed product. Units were not installed at our headquarters.
 

Kodak Spokesman

In a phone call with the BBC, Spotlite's Halston Mikail said the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) had prevented the scheme from going ahead.