Australia crushes on Fraudulent and Deceptive ICO

Australia’s financial regulator is repressing on misleading initial coin offerings (ICOs), referring on “a serious breach of the Australian law”
03 May 2018   78348

In the result of the regulator’s requests, some issuers have stopped their token sales or are updating their structures. On Tuesday the Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC) declared  that it is taking measures “on misleading or deceptive conduct in the marketing and selling of digital or virtual tokens via initial coin offerings (ICOs).” ASIC is an independent Australian governmental structure that conducts as the country’s corporate regulator.

ASIC is issuing inquiries to ICO issuers and their advisers where we identify conduct or statements that may be misleading or deceptive. This is in addition to our inquiries where we identify potentially unlicensed conduct. As a result of our inquiries, some issuers have halted their ICOs or have indicated the ICO structure will be modified.
ASIC
(The Australian Securities and Investments Commission)

ASIC has also refreshed its information sheet on ICOs and cryptocurrency which defines “misleading or deceptive conduct.”

If you are acting with someone else’s money, or selling something to someone, you have obligations. Regardless of the structure of the ICO, there is one law that will always apply: you cannot make misleading or deceptive statements about the product. This is going to be a key focus for us as this sector develops. 
John Price, 
Commissioner, ASIC

The Commission presented 4 examples of what this conduct may entail. “The use of social media to generate the appearance of a greater level of public interest in an ICO” is the 1 on the list, then “undertaking or arranging for a group to engage in trading strategies to generate the appearance of a greater level of buying and selling activity for an ICO or a crypto-asset.” Also, “failing to disclose adequate information about the ICO” and “suggesting that the ICO is a regulated product or the regulator has approved the ICO if that is not the case” are banned as well.

TenX to Confirm Founder's Relation to Lyoness Pyramid

From 2011 to 2015, Julian Hosp was a “member” of Lyoness
10 December 2018   61

Representatives of the blockchain start-up TenX confirmed that TenX founder Julian Josp was involved in the activities of the Austrian financial pyramid Lyoness.

TenX's Reddit report says that from 2011 to 2015, Julian Hosp was a “member” of Lyoness. In the company he was engaged in marketing, sales, held lectures for other participants of the company. However, at the end of 2015, Hosp broke all ties with Lyoness.

Earlier, The Financial Telegram reported that TenX Hosp tried to remove all public data linking it with Lyoness before the ICO project. However, according to TenX, Julian Hosp never concealed that he was associated with Lyoness and even wrote about it in his book “25 Stories I Would Tell My Younger Self (2015)".

We would also like to clarify that the stories contained in the online articles and Julian’s past affiliations with Lyoness bear no relevance to TenX, and TenX has had no connection, association and/or affiliation with Lyoness at any time.
 

TenX at Reddit

According to Breaker, Lyoness is recognized as an illegal fraudulent scheme by the Supreme Court of Switzerland, the Austrian civil court and the Norwegian Gambling Council. About the connection of Hosp with the project it became known thanks to the “training” video from Lyoness, allegedly voiced by his Julian.