Australia crushes on Fraudulent and Deceptive ICO

Australia’s financial regulator is repressing on misleading initial coin offerings (ICOs), referring on “a serious breach of the Australian law”
03 May 2018   674014

In the result of the regulator’s requests, some issuers have stopped their token sales or are updating their structures. On Tuesday the Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC) declared  that it is taking measures “on misleading or deceptive conduct in the marketing and selling of digital or virtual tokens via initial coin offerings (ICOs).” ASIC is an independent Australian governmental structure that conducts as the country’s corporate regulator.

ASIC is issuing inquiries to ICO issuers and their advisers where we identify conduct or statements that may be misleading or deceptive. This is in addition to our inquiries where we identify potentially unlicensed conduct. As a result of our inquiries, some issuers have halted their ICOs or have indicated the ICO structure will be modified.
ASIC
(The Australian Securities and Investments Commission)

ASIC has also refreshed its information sheet on ICOs and cryptocurrency which defines “misleading or deceptive conduct.”

If you are acting with someone else’s money, or selling something to someone, you have obligations. Regardless of the structure of the ICO, there is one law that will always apply: you cannot make misleading or deceptive statements about the product. This is going to be a key focus for us as this sector develops. 
John Price, 
Commissioner, ASIC

The Commission presented 4 examples of what this conduct may entail. “The use of social media to generate the appearance of a greater level of public interest in an ICO” is the 1 on the list, then “undertaking or arranging for a group to engage in trading strategies to generate the appearance of a greater level of buying and selling activity for an ICO or a crypto-asset.” Also, “failing to disclose adequate information about the ICO” and “suggesting that the ICO is a regulated product or the regulator has approved the ICO if that is not the case” are banned as well.

SEC to Accuse Veritaseum ICO of Fraud

SEC believes that project's tokensale, thru which it raised $14.8M back in 2017-2018 had a signs of scam and company misled the investors
14 August 2019   213

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has sued New Yorker  and Veritaseum-related companies that have been caught by the agency in conducting an unregistered ICO with signs of fraud. It is reported by Cointelegraph.

According to documents published on the network, the SEC intends to hold Reggie Middleton accountable and immediately freeze the assets of Veritaseum Inc. and Veritaseum LLC.

The Commission claims that the defendants raised about $ 14.8 million through an initial coin offering (ICO) in 2017 - early 2018. At the same time, many investors were misled, as the company distorted information about the conditions of the token sale and deliberately hid some significant details.

The American regulator claims that the project still has about $ 8 million of illegally raised funds. According to the SEC, these assets must be frozen immediately.

Amid this news, the Veritaseum (VERI) rate has fallen by 70%. Now the coin is trading near the $ 5 mark, although at the beginning of 2018 its rate was approaching $ 500.

Veritaseum was created as a financial p2p platform, involving the movement of capital without traditional intermediaries. Also, VERI was positioned as a utility token for use in consulting services and access to various research works.

In 2017, Veritaseum blockchain startup fell victim to hackers, having lost $ 8.4 million from ICO investors.