Australian authorities to regulate bitcoin

The Australian Parliament makes a move to control use of cryptocurrency
17 October 2017   464

Within the reform of governmental anti-money laundering and counter-terrorism financing law Australian authorities published a revision of the bill according to which bitcoin exchanges will be strictly controlled by the law. The Senate Legal and Constitutional Affairs Legislation Committee give priority to the regulation of digital currency operators.

The main measures applied to digital currency exchanges include the possibility of imposing civil penalties for operators of digital currency exchange services which are not registered, and enabling chief executive of Australian Transaction Reports and Analysis Centre to expand or narrow the boundaries of the digital currency definition.

AGD informed the committee that this aspect of the bill reflects technological advancements in digital currency. It noted that the current regulatory regime under the AML/CTF Act was designed in 2006 and applies only to an 'e-currency', which is 'backed by a physical thing. It excludes convertible digital currencies, such as Bitcoin, which are backed by a cryptographic algorithm'. 
 

Anti-Money Laundering and Counter-Terrorism Financing Amendment Bill 2017 

The approach of the committee to regulation is supported by an overview of the current legislation in accordance with the recommendations of the Attorney General (AGD). Legal Board called for recommendations on possible exemptions for transactions with a low value of less than $ 1,000 at bitcoin exchanges while The Law Council called imprisonment in connection with aggravating offenses between 2-4 years and even up to 7 years in cases which are extremely severe.

As soon as the committee recommended the bill to be introduced, the new service and register will be designated within six month’s from the adoption of the bill.

Tesla's cloud account hacked to mine cryptocurrency

Independent security group discovered Tesla's cloud account being hacked and infected with a miner-virus
21 February 2018   23

Cryptocurrencies are on the rise and all sorts of shady characters are trying to get in with dubious methods. Recent string of hacking attacks is a perfect example. And now not only exchanges and users with their hard-earned coins are in danger, but also companies with large cloud infrastructure face the same threat.

RedLock, a security research firm, reports that electric car manufacturer Tesla's cloud account information has been leaked to the internet, which allowed hackers to access the company's cloud. It has been hacked and hardware infected with a miner virus called Stratum. The mining protocol masks itself with low CPU usage and obscuring the IP of the mining server.

Of course, RedLock immediately contacted Tesla with this information and the company quickly got to fixing the breach. Tesla's spokesperson assured us that customer personal information hasn't been compromised, and that the vulnerability was patched in a matter of hours. Only small test park of internally-used engineering sample cars has been impacted and no indication whatsoever discovered that actual customer cars have been compromised in any way.

It certanly looks possible, because according to the same RedLock Cloud Security Intelligence group mining profitability of Tesla's cloud is worth a lot more that all the customer data available could be sold for on the black market. This also isn't the first instance of such a hack with no data being stolen. In fact, hacks with intention of hijacking mining capacity has already targeted Gemalto, a world's largest SIM-card manufacturer, and Aviva, a British insurance company, just to name a few.