Bitcoin Questions included into Dutch High School Exam

Bitcoin-themed mathematics questions have been cut-in in recent high school matriculation exams in the Netherlands
18 May 2018   859

About 200,000 Dutch students are to have taken the OVW exam, a obligatory test for students who wish to get tertiary education in the Netherlands. The testing list  included five bitcoin-themed questions.

Students were offered to solve five different mathematical problems. The questions asked that students “calculate in what year the amount of bitcoin exceeded 18 million,” “calculate from which year on the reward will be less than one bitcoin,” “determine the maximal amount of bitcoin that can be in circulation.” The resolution  of the issues was supposed to base on the formula used to employed to solve the questions.

Such kind of changes in testing for students is connected with the growing  recognition of cryptocurrency by the Holland’s institutions. In March, the Court of Amsterdam defined that bitcoin owns “properties of wealth” at the same time  adjudicating a civil rights occasion between an individual seeking repayment from an unfulfilled contract pertaining to bitcoin mining. The court ordered that “bitcoin represents a value and is transferable” and “thus shows characteristics of a property right. A claim for payment in Bitcoin is, therefore, to be regarded as a claim that qualifies for verification.”

Recently, Rob van Gijzel, the ambassador of the Dutch Blockchain Coalition, revealed a national blockchain research agenda, which had been accredited by the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs and Climate Policy. The ministry had established a designated committee, TopTeam ICT, appointed to analyze the potential legal, economic, and ethical implications of distributed ledger technology in the country.

BIS to Issue Research on Bitcoin Problems

Researcher from the Bank of International Settlements believes BTC should abadon PoW
22 January 2019   82

Researchers from the Bank for International Settlements published a report in which they stated that only by abandoning the Proof-of-Work mechanism of consensus, Bitcoin could get rid of its current and future problems.

According to them, in the future, when the size of the rewards for mining drops to zero, transaction processing fees alone will not be enough to justify the miners' activities. Consequently, the Bitcoin network will become so slow that it will be impossible to use it, the authors argue.

Simple calculations suggest that once block rewards are zero, it could take months before a Bitcoin payment is final, unless new technologies are deployed to speed up payment finality. 
 

Raphael Auer

Principal Economist, BIS

The BIS admits that second-level solutions such as the Lightning Network can ease the task, but “only fundamental remedy would be to depart from proof-of-work.” According to the report, the transition to alternative consensus mechanisms “require some form of social coordination or institutionalisation”.

The Bank for International Settlements contributes to the cooperation of 60 central banks from various countries of the world, which account for 95% of global GDP.

Earlier this month, the agency disclosed statistics on central bank initiatives in the field of state digital currencies. According to him, about 70% of central banks conduct research related to the issuance of national digital currencies, but plans for their implementation and the perception of the issue vary considerably in different countries