Bitcoin Questions included into Dutch High School Exam

Bitcoin-themed mathematics questions have been cut-in in recent high school matriculation exams in the Netherlands
18 May 2018   1485

About 200,000 Dutch students are to have taken the OVW exam, a obligatory test for students who wish to get tertiary education in the Netherlands. The testing list  included five bitcoin-themed questions.

Students were offered to solve five different mathematical problems. The questions asked that students “calculate in what year the amount of bitcoin exceeded 18 million,” “calculate from which year on the reward will be less than one bitcoin,” “determine the maximal amount of bitcoin that can be in circulation.” The resolution  of the issues was supposed to base on the formula used to employed to solve the questions.

Such kind of changes in testing for students is connected with the growing  recognition of cryptocurrency by the Holland’s institutions. In March, the Court of Amsterdam defined that bitcoin owns “properties of wealth” at the same time  adjudicating a civil rights occasion between an individual seeking repayment from an unfulfilled contract pertaining to bitcoin mining. The court ordered that “bitcoin represents a value and is transferable” and “thus shows characteristics of a property right. A claim for payment in Bitcoin is, therefore, to be regarded as a claim that qualifies for verification.”

Recently, Rob van Gijzel, the ambassador of the Dutch Blockchain Coalition, revealed a national blockchain research agenda, which had been accredited by the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs and Climate Policy. The ministry had established a designated committee, TopTeam ICT, appointed to analyze the potential legal, economic, and ethical implications of distributed ledger technology in the country.

BTC Futures Didn't Collapse Market in 2017, - CME

According to the managing director of CME Group, they "didn’t have that wherewithal, that ability to drive that impact"
14 November 2019   179

Tim McCourt, managing director of CME Group, has denied the widespread theory that the alleged launch of regulated bitcoin futures caused a market crash after the 2017 rally.

A lot of times, people ask us, ‘Did futures cause the price to decline from $20,000 to $3,000?’ And the answer is ‘no,’.
 

Tim McCourt

Global head of equity index and alternative investment products, CME Group

He recalled that at first the turnover of bitcoin futures on CME was 1,100 contracts, which is equivalent to 5300-5500 BTC or about $ 100 million at prices at the end of 2017.

There is no way over that period of time, given the size of the Bitcoin market, in terms of spot trading or the ability to mine Bitcoin, that futures could cause that impact. These things are governed by the law of supply and demand. We just didn’t have that wherewithal, that ability to drive that impact.
 

Tim McCourt

Global head of equity index and alternative investment products, CME Group

Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME) Bitcoin Futures was launched on December 18, 2017. A day earlier, the price of bitcoin reached a historic high in the region of $ 20,000, but soon plummeted.

Despite the sharp change of mood and the bear market, the volume of bitcoin futures trading on CME grew - by May of this year, the average daily turnover reached 13,600 contracts, corresponding to 68,000 BTC or $ 515 million at the exchange rate at that time.

We certainly play a role in the price discovery because people can freely express their demand to buy and sell at CME and transact with one another, but I wouldn’t necessarily say we are impacting price.
 

Tim McCourt

Global head of equity index and alternative investment products, CME Group

Among other things, a CME representative said that he is an ardent supporter of Bitcoin ETF and hopes to see such products on the market soon.

ETF providers and asset managers are our customers at CME. They use our futures products to create other ETFs, to hedge structure projects, and we’re certainly trying to enable them to do the same type of strategy on Bitcoin. We want to make sure they have the risk-management tools they need to be successful in managing their risk. We’re working with them to make sure they have what they need for trying to introduce products such as an ETF.
 

Tim McCourt

Global head of equity index and alternative investment products, CME Grou

Recently, Christopher Giancarlo, the former head of the Commodity Exchange Commodity Trading Commission (CFTC), said recently that the launch of the CME Bitcoin Futures was a targeted action by the Donald Trump administration to eliminate the bubble in the cryptocurrency market.