Bitcoin.org publishes SegWit2x supporters blacklist

A popular information resource about Bitcoin publishes a "blacklist" of websites that continue to support the SegWit2x hardfork 
12 October

Bitcoin.org bewares users of Bitcoin's possible incompatibility with some major services.

The company believes, that the upcoming hardfork is a backwards incompatible change to the Bitcoin network. This hardfork is not supported by the majority of the Bitcoin users and developers and is therefore a contentious hardfork. Accoroding to Bitcoin.org, the supporters of this agreement are "shifting their users to an alternative currency (an altcoin) which is incompatible with Bitcoin".

Therefore storing any BTC on services such as Coinbase, Bitpay and Xapo is strongly not recommended. By storing BTC on these services, you could find that after the hardfork, your BTC has been renamed to something else or replaced entirely with the new altcoin.
 

Bitcoin.org team

The best way to ensure that your BTC is protected is to download the latest version of Bitcoin Core and transfer out any BTC stored on services that are a signatory to this agreement, the company details.

As for mobile wallets, Bitcoin.org bewares that spending money from a mobile wallet during a hardfork is dangerous as you will be vulnerable to many attacks as your wallet is not aware that the miners are breaking the consensus rules on the longest chain.

Thus, the Bitcoin.org company has published a special list, consisting of the companies and services that have pledged to adopt the contentious hardfork:

Wallets

  • Abra (United States)
  • Bitcoin.com (St. Kitts & Nevis)
  • BitPay (United States)
  • BitPesa (Kenya)
  • Blockchain.info (UK)
  • BTC.com (China)
  • Circle (United States)
  • Coinbase (United States)
  • Coins.ph (Phillipines)
  • GoCoin (Isle of Man)
  • Jaxx (Canada)
  • Luno (Singapore)
  • Ripio (Argentina)
  • Unocoin (India)
  • Xapo (United States)

Exchanges

  • ANX (Hong Kong)
  • Bitex (Argentina)
  • bitFlyer (Japan)
  • Bitso (Mexico)
  • BTCC (China)
  • BTER.com (China)
  • Coinbase (United States)
  • Coins.ph (Phillipines)
  • CryptoFacilities (UK)
  • Korbit (South Korea)
  • Safello (Sweden)
  • SFOX (United States)
  • ShapeShift (Switzerland)

Miners

  • 1Hash (China)
  • Bitcoin.com (St. Kitts & Nevis)
  • Bitfury (United States)
  • Bitmain (China)
  • Bixin.com (China)
  • Genesis Mining (Hong Kong)
  • ViaBTC (China)

Other

  • Bitangel.com /Chandler Guo (China)
  • BitClub Network (Hong Kong)
  • Bloq (United States)
  • Civic (United States)
  • Decentral (Canada)
  • Digital Currency Group (United States)
  • Filament (United States)
  • Genesis Global Trading (United States)
  • Grayscale Investments (United States)
  • MONI (Finland)
  • OB1 (United States)
  • Netki (United States)
  • Purse (United States)
  • Veem (United States)

US Government to sell seized BTC and BCH

Government attorneys from Utah to sell the 513.1490393 BTC and equal amount of BCH, that were seized during anti-drug operation in 2016
15 December

The U.S. authorities is planning to sell off confiscated bitcoins seized during an drug case that are now worth almost $10 million. This is reported by the CoinDesk. 

Government attorneys in Utah are now working to sell the 513.1490393 bitcoins (BTC), worth approximately $8.7 million at current prices. An almost equal number of bitcoin cash (BCH) will also be sold (512.9274588), with value near to $949,000.

The BTC and BCH have been transferred to a government wallet. Due to the volatile market for cryptocurrencies, the BTC and BCH risk losing value during the pendency of the forfeiture proceedings ... For these reasons, the United States seeks an interlocutory sale.
 

US Government court order

 

Cryptocurrencies will be sold and converted into US dollars using one or more commercial cryptocurrency exchanges in increments of 50 coins or less. Proceeds will be deposited into the Treasury Forfeiture Fund Suspense account.

Dale Kimball, U.S. district judge, approved the sale of confiscated cryptocurrencies on Dec. 12 after the prosecutors in the case filed a request for the sale on the same day.

The drug crime case involves a Aaron Shamo, who was charged with running a multimillion-dollar opioid drug ring out of a Salt Lake City suburb in Nov. 2016. It was one of the largest busts of this kind in the country.