Bitcoin.org publishes SegWit2x supporters blacklist

A popular information resource about Bitcoin publishes a "blacklist" of websites that continue to support the SegWit2x hardfork 
12 October 2017   1628

Bitcoin.org bewares users of Bitcoin's possible incompatibility with some major services.

The company believes, that the upcoming hardfork is a backwards incompatible change to the Bitcoin network. This hardfork is not supported by the majority of the Bitcoin users and developers and is therefore a contentious hardfork. Accoroding to Bitcoin.org, the supporters of this agreement are "shifting their users to an alternative currency (an altcoin) which is incompatible with Bitcoin".

Therefore storing any BTC on services such as Coinbase, Bitpay and Xapo is strongly not recommended. By storing BTC on these services, you could find that after the hardfork, your BTC has been renamed to something else or replaced entirely with the new altcoin.
 

Bitcoin.org team

The best way to ensure that your BTC is protected is to download the latest version of Bitcoin Core and transfer out any BTC stored on services that are a signatory to this agreement, the company details.

As for mobile wallets, Bitcoin.org bewares that spending money from a mobile wallet during a hardfork is dangerous as you will be vulnerable to many attacks as your wallet is not aware that the miners are breaking the consensus rules on the longest chain.

Thus, the Bitcoin.org company has published a special list, consisting of the companies and services that have pledged to adopt the contentious hardfork:

Wallets

  • Abra (United States)
  • Bitcoin.com (St. Kitts & Nevis)
  • BitPay (United States)
  • BitPesa (Kenya)
  • Blockchain.info (UK)
  • BTC.com (China)
  • Circle (United States)
  • Coinbase (United States)
  • Coins.ph (Phillipines)
  • GoCoin (Isle of Man)
  • Jaxx (Canada)
  • Luno (Singapore)
  • Ripio (Argentina)
  • Unocoin (India)
  • Xapo (United States)

Exchanges

  • ANX (Hong Kong)
  • Bitex (Argentina)
  • bitFlyer (Japan)
  • Bitso (Mexico)
  • BTCC (China)
  • BTER.com (China)
  • Coinbase (United States)
  • Coins.ph (Phillipines)
  • CryptoFacilities (UK)
  • Korbit (South Korea)
  • Safello (Sweden)
  • SFOX (United States)
  • ShapeShift (Switzerland)

Miners

  • 1Hash (China)
  • Bitcoin.com (St. Kitts & Nevis)
  • Bitfury (United States)
  • Bitmain (China)
  • Bixin.com (China)
  • Genesis Mining (Hong Kong)
  • ViaBTC (China)

Other

  • Bitangel.com /Chandler Guo (China)
  • BitClub Network (Hong Kong)
  • Bloq (United States)
  • Civic (United States)
  • Decentral (Canada)
  • Digital Currency Group (United States)
  • Filament (United States)
  • Genesis Global Trading (United States)
  • Grayscale Investments (United States)
  • MONI (Finland)
  • OB1 (United States)
  • Netki (United States)
  • Purse (United States)
  • Veem (United States)

Chinese Miners to Fall Victims of Ransomware

Looks like ransomware came together with "improved" firmware, that should "overclock" device
21 January 2019   79

In China, a ransomware spreads, victims of which are Bitcoin miners. The damage from its activities is measured in tens of thousands of dollars. This is reported by Trustnodes.

The virus infects miners, released by Bitmain, and requires you to send 10 bitcoins, otherwise threatening to cause overheating of the device.

The problem is solved by formatting the SD card of the infected device, however, as Trustnodes notes, the whole process can take up to four days, while malicious software rapidly spreads to the other miners.

Compromised device
Compromised device

Probably, the virus comes with an "improved" firmware for miners. Some owners install such firmware to “overclock” their ASIC devices and improve their performance.

The first messages about the virus refer to August last year. In particular, Antminer S9, T9 and even L3 + for Litecoin were attacked. Over time, the malware has been improved. Now its distributor himself can decide when to display a message requesting a ransom. One miner also said that one night the address to which the 4,000 devices belonging to him sent the mined cryptocurrency was changed to the address of the hacker, which brought him $ 8,000.