Denmark to provide humanitarian aid via cryptocurrency

Denmark will become the first donor country to move money using cryptocurrencies
15 December 2017   1204

Yesterday the Danish Foreign Ministry published a report, in collaboration with think tank Sustania and blockchain currency platform Coinify, which investigates how blockchain technology might solve problems in providing development aid.

Crypto and crisis is a perfect match, and aid organizations will undeniably be able to respond more quickly using blockchain-based digital money, which arrives at email-speed, safely and transparently.

 

Marianne Haahr

Project Director, Sustania

One of Europe's biggest virtual currency platforms, Coinify, is working on using cryptocurrency payments to scale off-grid renewable energy.

You will be able to pay with your cryptos directly into a solar panel situated in, for example, an African village and then you would not donate money but electricity.

 

Mark Hojgaard

CEO, Coinify

Another option could be an online hub where people would donate to single projects like schools, railroads or bridges. Smart contracts would ensure that the money went to its intended project.

BTC Extortionists to Send Explosion Threats In US & CA

Police reported that explosive devices in the places specified by extortionists were not found
14 December 2018   79

In Canada and the United States, local businesses and residents received letters threatening to detonate a bomb if they did not send bitcoins to extortionists. Because of this, in some regions, law enforcement officers evacuated people from bus stations, schools and airports, reports Global News.

Extortionists threatened to blow up universities, schools, city halls and local businesses in the US states of Utah, Aidaxo, New York, Oklahoma and Illinois. The New York City Police Department urged residents not to panic or send bitcoins to criminals. Police also reported that explosive devices in the places specified by extortionists were not found.

In Canada, extortionists promised to blow up buildings and car dealerships in Toronto, Edmonton, Ottawa, Calgary and Montreal. Some residents of the attackers asked for a ransom in bitcoins in the amount of $ 20 thousand. After verification, the Calgary police stated that the messages were part of phishing attacks and did not pose a threat to the public.