DTCC to use blockchain on $11 trillion derivatives market

$11 trillion in derivatives are getting closer to the blockchain with the help of DTCC 
21 October 2017   2376

DTCC, the company that today settles the lion's share of U.S. securities, is moving forward blockchain.

The company reports that it has completed an early version of a blockchain that could one day support the trade of $11 trillion-worth of credit derivatives, as detailed by in an exclusive interview with coindesk.com. 

At first, the goal of the project was to upgrade the infrastructure underpinning the DTCC's centralized Trade Information Warehouse (TIW) for over-the-counter derivatives, reducing the time it takes to clear derivatives trades. In order to do that, the company teamed up with IBM, R3 and Axoni. Now, the partners are turning their attention to testing it, and preparing it for migration of the TIW data in a compliant way.

"The exciting thing is that there's continued comfort in the progress of the overall application and environment. There are always challenges, but we call it the 'noise of progress'."
 

Rob Palatnick
DTCC's chief technology architect

The man also reveals that Axo's AxCore protocol was originally derived from the public Ethereum blockchain, and that the DTCC's system uses the same Solidity smart contract language that powers its applications.

Still, AxCore has been modified to include a modular consensus mechanism that lets it tailor services to the specific needs of the DTCC, as well as submit real-time reports to both regulators and other counterparties. Unlike Ethereum, the DTCC implementation of AxCore does not include a token.

As reported, currently, the DTCC is working with regulators to align Axoni's built-in reporting database with regulatory requirements. According to Palatnick, the reports have to be as good as existing ones, but will be available on a continual basis as a result of the smart contract functionality. On top of that, the company is working with R3 and its network of over 100 global financial institution members to learn from standards-making bodies how to create "standards around what data should look like on a distributed ledger".

Following the launch, Axoni is to open-source the Axcore protocol.

Potentional Vulnerabilities Found in ETH 2.0

Least Authority have found potentional security issues in the network P2P interaction and block proposal system
26 March 2020   964

Technology security firm Least Authority, at the request of the Ethereum Foundation, conducted an audit of the Ethereum 2.0 specifications and identified several potential vulnerabilities at once.

Least Authority said that developers need to solve problems with vulnerabilities in the network layer of peer-to-peer (P2P) interaction, as well as in the block proposal system. At the same time, the auditor noted that the specifications are "very well thought out and competent."

However, at the moment there is no large ecosystem based on PoS and using sharding in the world, so it is impossible to accurately assess the prospects for system stability.
Also, information security experts emphasized that the specifications did not pay enough attention to the description of the P2P network level and the system of records about Ethereum nodes. Vulnerability risks are also observed in the block proposal system and the messaging system between nodes.

Experts said that in the blockchains running on PoS, the choice of a new block is simple and no one can predict who will get the new block. In PoS systems, it is the block proposal system that decides whose block will fall into the blockchain, and this leads to the risk of data leakage. To solve the problem, auditors suggested using the mechanism of "Single Secret Leader Election" (SSLE).

As for the peer-to-peer exchange system, there is a danger of spam. There is no centralized node in the system that would evaluate the actions of other nodes, so a “malicious" node can spam the entire network with various messages without any special punishment. The solution to this problem may be to use special protocols for exchanging messages between nodes.