ERC725: self-sovereign identity standard for ETH released

Ethereum developer Fabian Vogelsteller creates Ethereum Request for Comment 725 (ERC725) on GitHub
12 October 2017   2359

Ethereum developer Fabian Vogelsteller created Ethereum Request for Comment 725 (ERC725) on GitHub. Despite the fact, that the project doesn’t even have an assigned Ethereum Improvement Proposal number, within 24 hours, the plan for a standardized identity system for humans and machines gained significant hype.

On GitHub, UX designer and fellow Ethereum Foundation member Alex Van de Sande called the ERC “very useful,” while suggesting some adjustments.

In an email to ethnews.com, Vogelsteller explaines, that “identity is certainly one of the most [important] missing pieces in the blockchain ecosystem". According to the creator, ERC725 solves quite a lot of problems. 

“This needs to be standardized so that other contracts can interact with real world identities, automatically check and verify them. It’s not mainly necessary for interfaces alone. Also, this contract represents ONE identity. The addition of claims needs to be standardized, so that other identities can issue claims about each other.
 

Fabian Vogelsteller
Ethereum Request for Comment 725 (ERC725) creator

As the man views it, crrently everybody collects all information about you separately to make sure they know who you are (e.g. banks, credit services, or any service which needs to have KYC). A standard will help insofar that everybody can auto check certain claims, and therefore don’t need to store actual details about you anymore, as they - as long as they trust the claim issuer – don’t need to have the actual information. The current over-collecting is because of lack of a better system.

On October 12th, Fabian Vogelsteller is to present ERC725 at the Ethereum London Meetup. What the future has in stock for it, remains to be seen, yet is is definitely worth monitoring.

Ethereum price chart on coinmarketcap.com
Ethereum price chart on coinmarketcap.com

Meanwhile, at the time of writing, Ethereum price is about $303.33, its market capitalization is $28,835,297,776.

Great Chinese Firewall to Block ETH Explorer

Looks like it's the first time that a blockchain observer (etherscan. io in this case) has become a target for Internet censorship in China
04 December 2019   97

The Great Chinese Firewall, used by the authorities to regulate access to foreign sites, blocked etherscan.io, one of the most popular services for viewing the statistics of the Ethereum network.

According to CoinDesk, as of early December, the portal is not accessible from IP addresses in mainland China. According to the service greatfire.org, blocking has been carried out at least since October 30.

Presumably this is the first time that a blockchain observer has become a target for Internet censorship in China.

This is another instance of friction between the decentralized and immutable technology of blockchain and the tightly controlled, centralized government of China. We should expect additional problems like these in the future as blockchain is integrated further into the Chinese economy and daily life.
 

Matthew Graham

CEO, Sino Global Capital

In his opinion, we should expect similar problems in the future, since the blockchain is increasingly being integrated into the Chinese economy.

It is not known exactly what caused etherscan.io to become blocked.

Last year, it was reported that users encoded censored articles in an Ethereum transaction and shared the hashes of these transactions in the WeChat messenger using etherscan.io.

Some have used this feature to post sensitive messages without the need to worry about the message being blocked or removed, or their identity being exposed. Anyone with a blockchain explorer like Etherscan can view these messages, so it is not surprising that this website has come in the crosshairs of internet censors.
 

Matthew Graham

CEO, Sino Global Capital

The founder of etherscan.io, Matthew Tan, confirmed that the site in China has been blocked "for the past three months." He could not name the exact date and reason for what happened.