Ex S&P President to Invest in iComply Startup

The startup is aimed at developing tools and services to meet the regulative standards for blockchain start-ups
14 August 2018   1309

Startup iComply, working in the field of regulatory technologies and compliance with standards, has just completed the initial round of financing, which was headed by former Standard & Poor CEO Deven Sharma, CoinDesk reports.

IComply, aimed at developing tools and services to meet the regulative standards for blockchain start-ups (especially for those that conduct ICO), said on Monday that it attracted a seven-figure sum during this invest-round, but did not say the exact figure. The round was also attended by DMG Blockchain and Block X Capital.

In addition, iComply reported that it was joined by former employee of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) Jeff Bandman, former Managing Director of NASDAQ and the Financial Services Industry Regulation Service (FINRA) Manny Alikandro, MIT Connection Science program member, Praveen Mandal and Prosecutor Thomas Linder.

According to Sharma, he decided to invest in the startup iComply, because the project "is focused on services for ICOs related to risks and compliance with standards." Compliance with the standards, he said, will ensure the transparency of ICO issuers and thereby help to ease the concerns of regulators.

Sharma also believes that iComply can contribute to the spread of crypto technologies, helping the entry of traditional financial services into this industry.

My interest is to see iComply evolve into a benchmark that investors can use to assess credibility of issuers, sustainability of underlying services and the price of ICOs. iComply's patent-pending software enables both security and utility tokens to monitor and document compliance, governance and risk procedures, before a public blockchain executes an immutable trade, providing trust, integrity and transparency for our clients. There have been a few ICOs that had a fundamentally robust offering that I understood and did interest me [but I] missed the opportunity. Others that have transparency from a service like iComply, I would [invest in].
 

Deven Sharma

Ex-president, Standarts & Poors

It is the ideas of transparency and trust, according to Sharma, that sparked his interest in order to start working with the blockbuster. 

SEC to Accuse Veritaseum ICO of Fraud

SEC believes that project's tokensale, thru which it raised $14.8M back in 2017-2018 had a signs of scam and company misled the investors
14 August 2019   213

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has sued New Yorker  and Veritaseum-related companies that have been caught by the agency in conducting an unregistered ICO with signs of fraud. It is reported by Cointelegraph.

According to documents published on the network, the SEC intends to hold Reggie Middleton accountable and immediately freeze the assets of Veritaseum Inc. and Veritaseum LLC.

The Commission claims that the defendants raised about $ 14.8 million through an initial coin offering (ICO) in 2017 - early 2018. At the same time, many investors were misled, as the company distorted information about the conditions of the token sale and deliberately hid some significant details.

The American regulator claims that the project still has about $ 8 million of illegally raised funds. According to the SEC, these assets must be frozen immediately.

Amid this news, the Veritaseum (VERI) rate has fallen by 70%. Now the coin is trading near the $ 5 mark, although at the beginning of 2018 its rate was approaching $ 500.

Veritaseum was created as a financial p2p platform, involving the movement of capital without traditional intermediaries. Also, VERI was positioned as a utility token for use in consulting services and access to various research works.

In 2017, Veritaseum blockchain startup fell victim to hackers, having lost $ 8.4 million from ICO investors.