Google to block malvertising attempts

Google devs propose changes to the Chrome browser that could prevent malvertising attacks
21 October 2017   1068

Cryptocurrency world has suffered a lot from the hackers.
Now, a new "disease" is so-called “malvertising", which uses online ads as channels to transmit script that causes visitors’ browsers to mine altcoins for the perpetrator. 

Google software engineer, Ojan Vafai, proposes a modification to the Chrome browser that would inhibit and potentially prevent malvertising.

A modification for malvertising prevention
A modification for malvertising prevention

Initially, the man commented on the post about unauthorized mining that was being executed by code from the software firm Coin Hive, which had debuted its flagship mining product four days earlier. Thus, Vafai gives some recommendation to combat the issue.

If a site is using more than XX% CPU for more than YY seconds, then we put the page into ‘battery saver mode’ where we aggressively throttle tasks and show a toast allowing the user to opt-out of battery saver mode. When a battery saver mode tab is backgrounded, we stop running tasks entirely. I think we'll want measurement to figure out what values to use for XX and YY, but we can start with really egregious things like 100% and 60 seconds. I'm effectively suggesting we add a permission here, but it would have unusual triggering conditions (e.g. no requestUseLotsOfCPU method). It only triggers when the page is doing a likely bad thing.
 

Ojan Vafai
Google software engineer

In other words, the solution would equip Chrome to recognize suspicious activity and take action to significantly impact the amount of processing power that mining software could appropriate by subjecting the culprit page to a setting that limits CPU usage. Chrome would simultaneously offer users the option to exit this power-saving state. 

Yet it is rather unclear whether Google intends to implement any protections against malvertising or not. Still, the proposal has already drawn a lot of attention. 

Most Crypto-Optimists Live in Norway, Bitflyer Study

According to bitFlyer's poll on future of crypto, europeans believes cryptocurrency has future
24 April 2019   104

Most Europeans believe that in ten years digital currencies will continue to be in demand, but they do not have the same confidence about Bitcoin. This is reported by Cryptonews, citing a study of the bitFlyer.

10 thousand people from ten European countries took part in the online survey. Of these, 63% believe in a “bright future” cryptocurrency. However, not all Europeans are confident in the future of Bitcoin - only 55% believe that the first cryptocurrency will exist in ten years.

It is also noteworthy that, despite the fall in prices of most cryptocurrencies that lasted for almost a year, the majority of respondents positively assessed the prospects for the development of the market.

Most of the “crypto-optimists” turned out to live in Norway - 73% of the inhabitants of this Scandinavian country are convinced that a decade later, digital currencies will still be in society. This is followed by Italy (68%), the Netherlands and Poland close the top four (67% each).

The percentage of consumers who believe cryptocurrencies will still exist in 10 years’ time
The percentage of consumers who believe cryptocurrencies will still exist in 10 years’ time

But the exact form of cryptocurrency will exist, almost no one knows. Only 8% believe that they will become money, and 7% - a tool for investment or a means of preserving value.

The fact that Bitcoin is not generating as much support as other cryptocurrencies is in part a symptom of the market’s volatility, but is also a direct impact of the constant media attention that is associated to its volatility.
 

Andy Bryant

COO, bitFlyer Europe

He also added that the study demonstrated how much remains to be done to increase public awareness of the benefits and opportunities of cryptocurrencies.