Google to block malvertising attempts

Google devs propose changes to the Chrome browser that could prevent malvertising attacks
21 October 2017   775

Cryptocurrency world has suffered a lot from the hackers.
Now, a new "disease" is so-called “malvertising", which uses online ads as channels to transmit script that causes visitors’ browsers to mine altcoins for the perpetrator. 

Google software engineer, Ojan Vafai, proposes a modification to the Chrome browser that would inhibit and potentially prevent malvertising.

A modification for malvertising prevention
A modification for malvertising prevention

Initially, the man commented on the post about unauthorized mining that was being executed by code from the software firm Coin Hive, which had debuted its flagship mining product four days earlier. Thus, Vafai gives some recommendation to combat the issue.

If a site is using more than XX% CPU for more than YY seconds, then we put the page into ‘battery saver mode’ where we aggressively throttle tasks and show a toast allowing the user to opt-out of battery saver mode. When a battery saver mode tab is backgrounded, we stop running tasks entirely. I think we'll want measurement to figure out what values to use for XX and YY, but we can start with really egregious things like 100% and 60 seconds. I'm effectively suggesting we add a permission here, but it would have unusual triggering conditions (e.g. no requestUseLotsOfCPU method). It only triggers when the page is doing a likely bad thing.
 

Ojan Vafai
Google software engineer

In other words, the solution would equip Chrome to recognize suspicious activity and take action to significantly impact the amount of processing power that mining software could appropriate by subjecting the culprit page to a setting that limits CPU usage. Chrome would simultaneously offer users the option to exit this power-saving state. 

Yet it is rather unclear whether Google intends to implement any protections against malvertising or not. Still, the proposal has already drawn a lot of attention. 

'Kodak Miner' Turned Out to be a Scam

KashMiner by Spotlite USA was promoted as Kodak branded bitcoin miner 
17 July 2018   137

The KashMiner bitcoin miner, exhibited at the Kodak stand during the CES technology show in Las Vegas, was in fact a product designed to mislead potential consumers and with a potentially unattainable potential return. This is reported by BBC.

Spotlite USA is licensed by Kodak's lighting division, which allows it to use the famous brand in its products. In January 2018 the company introduced its miner and announced that it intends to lease it. According to its business plan, potential users had to pay a commission before getting the device. It was expected that after depositing $ 3,400, the customer will receive a device that will allow him to easily cover expenses and receive revenue from bitcoin mining.

However the company did not have an official Kodak license to use the brand in the production of mining equipment and initially overstated the indicators of the potential profit of its device, refusing to take into account the growing complexity and costs of bitcoin mining. The advertising materials reported that KashMiner brings $ 375 a month, which, subject to a 2-year contract, would allow the client to receive $ 5,600 of profit after paying a commission. Experts from the industry of cryptocurrency call this offer a scam.

There is no way your magical Kodak miner will make the same $375 every month.
 

Saifedean Ammous

Economist

CEO Spotlite USA Halston Mikail previously reported that he plans to install hundreds of miners at the headquarters of Kodak. According to him, he already managed to place 80 miners there, but the Kodak spokesman denied this information.

While you saw units at CES from our licensee Spotlite, the KashMiner is not a Kodak brand licensed product. Units were not installed at our headquarters.
 

Kodak Spokesman

In a phone call with the BBC, Spotlite's Halston Mikail said the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) had prevented the scheme from going ahead.