Google to block malvertising attempts

Google devs propose changes to the Chrome browser that could prevent malvertising attacks
21 October 2017   1168

Cryptocurrency world has suffered a lot from the hackers.
Now, a new "disease" is so-called “malvertising", which uses online ads as channels to transmit script that causes visitors’ browsers to mine altcoins for the perpetrator. 

Google software engineer, Ojan Vafai, proposes a modification to the Chrome browser that would inhibit and potentially prevent malvertising.

A modification for malvertising prevention
A modification for malvertising prevention

Initially, the man commented on the post about unauthorized mining that was being executed by code from the software firm Coin Hive, which had debuted its flagship mining product four days earlier. Thus, Vafai gives some recommendation to combat the issue.

If a site is using more than XX% CPU for more than YY seconds, then we put the page into ‘battery saver mode’ where we aggressively throttle tasks and show a toast allowing the user to opt-out of battery saver mode. When a battery saver mode tab is backgrounded, we stop running tasks entirely. I think we'll want measurement to figure out what values to use for XX and YY, but we can start with really egregious things like 100% and 60 seconds. I'm effectively suggesting we add a permission here, but it would have unusual triggering conditions (e.g. no requestUseLotsOfCPU method). It only triggers when the page is doing a likely bad thing.
 

Ojan Vafai
Google software engineer

In other words, the solution would equip Chrome to recognize suspicious activity and take action to significantly impact the amount of processing power that mining software could appropriate by subjecting the culprit page to a setting that limits CPU usage. Chrome would simultaneously offer users the option to exit this power-saving state. 

Yet it is rather unclear whether Google intends to implement any protections against malvertising or not. Still, the proposal has already drawn a lot of attention. 

Old Korean Social Network to Close After Tokensale

Cyworld platform started operating back in 1999 and it conducted an IEO at CoinZest this year
14 October 2019   49

Investors who acquired the clink cryptocurrency issued by the South Korean social network Cyworld are worried about the status of their investments due to the company's sudden closure, reports Korea Times. Some of them are ready to go to court.

The Cyworld platform was launched in 1999 and was especially popular among the country's population until the mid-2000s. The company, however, failed to see the trend towards the development of mobile solutions on time and as a result lost its position in the market. On October 1, it closed her platform without posting any warnings to users.

At the same time, the Clink site was unavailable, and Cyworld management continues to ignore the numerous requests of investors. The Korean exchanges CoinZest and BitSonic, where Clink is still being traded, are considering delisting the asset. Industry officials say Clink's investor losses will be at least 1 billion won ($ 845,000).

Clink's primary distribution was through IEO through the CoinZest platform earlier this year and, according to the Korea Times, it was the company's attempt to bring a fading social network back to life. A total of 24 million Clink tokens were sold for a total of 480 million won ($ 400,000).

In the second half of 2019, employees who have not received salaries since the end of 2018 began to leave the company en masse. Since the start of trading, the Clink price has fallen from 26 won to 0.19 won. According to the Coingecko portal, Clink's current capitalization and revolving volume are unknown, while the marginal issue volume is 10 billion units.