Google Kubernets in Action

Know how Google Kubernets works on real-life examples for different types of applications - Gaming, IoT and Analytics
10 August 2017   1866

Kubernetes deployments on Google’s cloud use the same underlying objects as on-premise, but with cloud provider specific networking, storage and services. This talk highlights the use of Kubernetes in Google Container Engine for different types of applications - Gaming, IoT and Analytics. We will walk through the generic architecture for each application type as well as specific implementations for illustration. Upgrading a Kubernetes cluster for greater scale, setting up multi-zone clusters for higher availability and using Ingress with L7 LB for global load balancing will be some of highlights.

About Robert Bailey
Robert has been working on Kubernetes for more than 2 years and was one of the founding members of the Google Container Engine team. Prior to Kubernetes, he was a Site Reliability Engineer helping teams around Google launch new products and services.

About Aparna Sinha
Aparna Sinha leads the product management team at Google for Kubernetes. Prior to Google, Aparna has worked in enterprise software for 15+ years. She was previously Director of Product Management for NetApp’s manageability software where she also led development of storage plugins for Oracle, VMware, Unix and Windows. She holds a PhD in Engineering from Stanford and has several publications from her research work as well as a patent at Google on Android IoT protocols.

ClusterFuzz to be Open Source Now

Program's code is written in Python and Go, and distributed under the Apache 2.0 license
08 February 2019   228

Google has opened the source code for the ClusterFuzz platform, intended for fuzzing code testing using a server cluster. In addition to coordinating the execution of checks, ClusterFuzz also automates the execution of tasks such as sending a notification to developers, creating an application for a patch (issue), tracking a bug fix, and closing reports after a patch. The code is written in Python and Go, and distributed under the Apache 2.0 license. ClusterFuzz instances can run on Linux, macOS and Windows systems, as well as in various cloud environments.

Since 2011, ClusterFuzz has been used in the depths of Google to detect errors in the Chrome codebase and to ensure the operation of the OSS-Fuzz project, in the framework of which continuous fuzzing testing of open source software was organized. In total, ClusterFuzz has revealed more than 16 thousand errors in Chrome and more than 11 thousand errors in 160 open source projects participating in the OSS-Fuzz program. Due to the continuous process of checking the current code base, errors are usually caught within a few parts after the code is introduced and the changes causing them.