Hack bill to allow hacked companies to "hack back"

A "hack bill", which is currently in the House of Representatives, would allow hacking victims to take certain retaliatory actions against the attackers
21 October 2017   1523

Rep. Tom Graves (R-GA-14) and Rep. Kyrsten Sinema (D-AZ-9) have introduced the Active Cyber Defense Certainty (ACDC) Act in the House of Representatives.

Active Cyber Defense Certainty Act
Active Cyber Defense Certainty Act

Known as the “hack back” bill, H.R. 4036 would amend the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (section 1030 of title 18, United States Code) by defining the parameters within which parties defending their own computers or networks can respond to attacks by hacking the perpetrators.

Thus, if passed, the ACDC would except a hacking victim (a “defender”) “who uses a [tracking] program, code, or command” to help identify the source of a hack from prosecution under section 1030, so long as the software “originated on the computer of the defender but [was] copied or removed by an unauthorized user”. On top of that, the defender’s actions must not “result in the destruction of data or result in an impairment of the essential operating functionality of the attacker’s computer system, or intentionally create a backdoor enabling intrusive access into the attacker’s computer system".

The bill would also exclude from prosecution a defender who carries out an “active cyber defense measure,” defined as any measure by which the victim accesses an attacker’s computer to gather information that would help identify the attacker, disrupt continued hacking, or monitor the attacker “to assist in developing future … cyber defense techniques".

The ACDC would also authorize hacking victims to retrieve and destroy files stolen from them.

Finally, the bill requires defenders to notify the FBI’s National Cyber Investigative Joint Task Force of the type of breach that occurred, the intended target of the victim’s active cyber defense measures, and the steps that the victim intends to take in order to preserve evidence of the hack and prevent future attacks. 

However, probably, it's too early to be so excited.

Computer defenders should also exercise ex- 2 treme caution to avoid violating the law of any other 3 nation where an attacker’s computer may reside.
 

From the Active Cyber Defense Certainty Act

Thus, the ACDC also highlights that if untrained actors are authorized to retaliate against hackers, they may end up inadvertently victimizing innocent third parties. In light of this reality, the bill’s cautionary statement seemingly undercuts much of the power that the bill aims to grant hacking victims.

Member of British Parliament Wants to Payl Tax in BTC

MP  comments were made shortly after the Ohio government allowed companies registered in this state to pay bitcoin taxes
11 December 2018   7

Eddie Hughes, a member of the UK Conservative Party, said that the state should make it possible to use Bitcoin when paying taxes and utilities. It is reported by The Daily Express.

Eddie Hughes, who represents North Walsall in parliament, calls himself a "crypto-enthusiast with amateur knowledge." According to him, the blockchain technology attracts a lot of attention, and therefore members of parliament "must understand it."

Eddie Hughes also said that he recently met with representatives of the Royal Society for Water Rescue, which accepts donations in cryptocurrencies, after which he came to the idea of ​​making it possible to use Bitcoin when paying municipal taxes and utilities.

It just feels like it gets talked about a lot, wherever you go in the UK, and as MPs we have a duty to understand it. 
 

Eddie Hughes

MP

Hughes comments were made shortly after the Ohio government allowed companies registered in this state to pay bitcoin taxes, which he also reminded in his interview within the publication.