Hack bill to allow hacked companies to "hack back"

A "hack bill", which is currently in the House of Representatives, would allow hacking victims to take certain retaliatory actions against the attackers
21 October 2017   1794

Rep. Tom Graves (R-GA-14) and Rep. Kyrsten Sinema (D-AZ-9) have introduced the Active Cyber Defense Certainty (ACDC) Act in the House of Representatives.

Active Cyber Defense Certainty Act
Active Cyber Defense Certainty Act

Known as the “hack back” bill, H.R. 4036 would amend the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (section 1030 of title 18, United States Code) by defining the parameters within which parties defending their own computers or networks can respond to attacks by hacking the perpetrators.

Thus, if passed, the ACDC would except a hacking victim (a “defender”) “who uses a [tracking] program, code, or command” to help identify the source of a hack from prosecution under section 1030, so long as the software “originated on the computer of the defender but [was] copied or removed by an unauthorized user”. On top of that, the defender’s actions must not “result in the destruction of data or result in an impairment of the essential operating functionality of the attacker’s computer system, or intentionally create a backdoor enabling intrusive access into the attacker’s computer system".

The bill would also exclude from prosecution a defender who carries out an “active cyber defense measure,” defined as any measure by which the victim accesses an attacker’s computer to gather information that would help identify the attacker, disrupt continued hacking, or monitor the attacker “to assist in developing future … cyber defense techniques".

The ACDC would also authorize hacking victims to retrieve and destroy files stolen from them.

Finally, the bill requires defenders to notify the FBI’s National Cyber Investigative Joint Task Force of the type of breach that occurred, the intended target of the victim’s active cyber defense measures, and the steps that the victim intends to take in order to preserve evidence of the hack and prevent future attacks. 

However, probably, it's too early to be so excited.

Computer defenders should also exercise ex- 2 treme caution to avoid violating the law of any other 3 nation where an attacker’s computer may reside.
 

From the Active Cyber Defense Certainty Act

Thus, the ACDC also highlights that if untrained actors are authorized to retaliate against hackers, they may end up inadvertently victimizing innocent third parties. In light of this reality, the bill’s cautionary statement seemingly undercuts much of the power that the bill aims to grant hacking victims.

Old Korean Social Network to Close After Tokensale

Cyworld platform started operating back in 1999 and it conducted an IEO at CoinZest this year
14 October 2019   49

Investors who acquired the clink cryptocurrency issued by the South Korean social network Cyworld are worried about the status of their investments due to the company's sudden closure, reports Korea Times. Some of them are ready to go to court.

The Cyworld platform was launched in 1999 and was especially popular among the country's population until the mid-2000s. The company, however, failed to see the trend towards the development of mobile solutions on time and as a result lost its position in the market. On October 1, it closed her platform without posting any warnings to users.

At the same time, the Clink site was unavailable, and Cyworld management continues to ignore the numerous requests of investors. The Korean exchanges CoinZest and BitSonic, where Clink is still being traded, are considering delisting the asset. Industry officials say Clink's investor losses will be at least 1 billion won ($ 845,000).

Clink's primary distribution was through IEO through the CoinZest platform earlier this year and, according to the Korea Times, it was the company's attempt to bring a fading social network back to life. A total of 24 million Clink tokens were sold for a total of 480 million won ($ 400,000).

In the second half of 2019, employees who have not received salaries since the end of 2018 began to leave the company en masse. Since the start of trading, the Clink price has fallen from 26 won to 0.19 won. According to the Coingecko portal, Clink's current capitalization and revolving volume are unknown, while the marginal issue volume is 10 billion units.