How to run Java EE in the cloud?

Three skilled Java coders talks about running Java EE in the cloud
17 October 2017   1682

This session is a fast-paced tour of the many options available for running Java EE applications in the cloud. It covers bare metal IaaS options such as AWS; PaaS options that provide native support for Java EE, such as Oracle Java Cloud Service/BlueMix; and everything in between. It also discusses how to deploy Dockerized Java EE applications to options such as Jelastic as well as running Java EE applications by using fat-jar solutions such as WildFly Swarm on bare JVM-based platforms such as Heroku. The presentation includes plenty of code examples and demos along the way.

Speakers are:

  • Rodrigo Bortoloto, Sr. Manager, CapTech Consulting
  • Ryan Cuprak, Analyst, Dassault Systemes
  • Reza Rahman, Consultant, Independent

Microsoft to Use Chromium for Edge Browser

The company has already placed the repository on GitHub to attract new members to the development of the browser
07 December 2018   109

Microsoft Vice President Joe Belfiore said that from December 6, 2018, the company will use the Chromium engine in the Microsoft Edge browser. According to him, Microsoft also plans to develop browsers for smartphones and other devices.

The company has already placed the repository on GitHub to attract new members to the development of the browser. Microsoft expects that the transition to the new engine will be a big step in the development of Microsoft Edge. For example, the browser will finally be adapted for macOS.

According to Belfiore, the company plans to improve the project in three areas:

  • Users will get hardware integration, improved browser compatibility with sites and reduced power consumption of devices when using it.
  • Web developers will appreciate the reduced fragmentation of a web platform for testing sites.
  • The corporate IT sector will get the compatibility of old and new Windows applications that run in the browser.

He noted that during the year the company would work “under the hood” of Microsoft Edge, and named several key stages of this process. For example, the transition to a platform compatible with the Chromium engine for developing a desktop version of the browser. It is also planned that most platforms and all versions of Windows will support Microsoft Edge.