How to use sagas in Java?

Video tutorial on using sagas to maintain data consistency in a microservice architecture
29 August 2017   487

The microservice architecture structures an application as a set of loosely coupled, collaborating services. Maintaining data consistency is challenging since each service has its own database to ensure loose coupling. To make matters worse, for a variety of reasons distributed transactions using JTA are not an option for modern applications.

In this talk Chris Richardson describes an alternative transaction model known as a saga. You will learn about the benefits and drawbacks of using sagas. Chris describes how sagas are eventually consistent rather than ACID and what this means for developers. You will learn how to design and implement sagas in a Java application.

Chris Richardson is a developer and architect. He is the author of POJOs in Action, which describes how to build enterprise Java applications with frameworks such as Spring and Hibernate. Chris was also the founder of the original CloudFoundry.com, an early Java PaaS for Amazon EC2. Today, he is a recognized thought leader in microservices.

What is Web3j?

Small review of lightweight Java and Android library for integration with Ethereum clients
15 December 2017   831

What is webj3?

web3j is a lightweight, highly modular, reactive, type safe Java and Android library for working with Smart Contracts and integrating with clients (nodes) on the Ethereum network:

web3j architecture
Web3j Architecture

This allows you to work with the Ethereum blockchain, without the additional overhead of having to write your own integration code for the platform.

According to the developers, these are the features:

  • Complete implementation of Ethereum's JSON-RPC client API over HTTP and IPC
  • Ethereum wallet support
  • Auto-generation of Java smart contract wrappers to create, deploy, transact with and call smart contracts from native Java code (Solidity and Truffle definition formats supported)
  • Reactive-functional API for working with filters
  • Ethereum Name Service (ENS) support
  • Support for Parity's Personal, and Geth's Personal client APIs
  • Support for Infura, so you don't have to run an Ethereum client yourself
  • Comprehensive integration tests demonstrating a number of the above scenarios
  • Command line tools
  • Android compatible
  • Support for JP Morgan's Quorum via web3j-quorum

It has five runtime dependencies:

  • RxJava for its reactive-functional API
  • OKHttp for HTTP connections
  • Jackson Core for fast JSON serialisation/deserialisation
  • Bouncy Castle (Spongy Castle on Android) for crypto
  • Jnr-unixsocket for *nix IPC (not available on Android)

It also uses JavaPoet for generating smart contract wrappers.

Lear more at GitHub.