HP and Nokia to allow users to sell their data

HP and Nokia partnered with Streamr to allow users to sell their everyday data on the blockchain
18 May 2018   1171

Every day people's actions produce the most valuable resource in the today's world – information. And Hewlett-Packard Enterprise Co. (HPE) and Nokia plan to give us the ability to sell this mundane information about our offline activities for the Streamr's DATAcoin (DATA).

HPE and Nokia have partnered with a Swiss blockchain startup Streamr to give users an ability to sell their day-to-day collected data, for example vehicle sensor data, to the secure “data marketplace” on blockchain.

The system works by collecting information from different sources and later selling access to it to the companies for commercial or social utilization. For example, the car with several sensors can transmit information about windshield wiper activity to issue weather warnings in the area, sensors in the suspension can be used by local government to plan road repairs without a need for expensive road survey efforts, and fuel level sensor data can be used by sellers to predict the demand in the specific area.

In this partnership Streamr provides their blockchain expertise, while HPE provides their technology knowledge to expand the possible use cases. Nokia also pitches in with its mobile base-station devices, that can collect weather data in remote low-signal-coverage areas, like farms. This weather pattern data can be beneficial in agricultural applications to control irrigation and sowing, for example.

At the time of press, DATAcoin is trading at $0,10 USD, with a market cap of $67 930 787 and 24h volume of $1 698 060.

Potentional Vulnerabilities Found in ETH 2.0

Least Authority have found potentional security issues in the network P2P interaction and block proposal system
26 March 2020   202

Technology security firm Least Authority, at the request of the Ethereum Foundation, conducted an audit of the Ethereum 2.0 specifications and identified several potential vulnerabilities at once.

Least Authority said that developers need to solve problems with vulnerabilities in the network layer of peer-to-peer (P2P) interaction, as well as in the block proposal system. At the same time, the auditor noted that the specifications are "very well thought out and competent."

However, at the moment there is no large ecosystem based on PoS and using sharding in the world, so it is impossible to accurately assess the prospects for system stability.
Also, information security experts emphasized that the specifications did not pay enough attention to the description of the P2P network level and the system of records about Ethereum nodes. Vulnerability risks are also observed in the block proposal system and the messaging system between nodes.

Experts said that in the blockchains running on PoS, the choice of a new block is simple and no one can predict who will get the new block. In PoS systems, it is the block proposal system that decides whose block will fall into the blockchain, and this leads to the risk of data leakage. To solve the problem, auditors suggested using the mechanism of "Single Secret Leader Election" (SSLE).

As for the peer-to-peer exchange system, there is a danger of spam. There is no centralized node in the system that would evaluate the actions of other nodes, so a “malicious" node can spam the entire network with various messages without any special punishment. The solution to this problem may be to use special protocols for exchanging messages between nodes.