IoT integration: Cisco files patent for blockchain

The technology conglomerate Cisco applies to patent for an invention that could enhance the efficiency of IoT networks
24 October 2017   1784

The technology conglomerate Cisco files US patent application for “Block Chain Based IoT Device Identity Verification and Anomaly Detection”.

Cisco patent application
Cisco patent application

The concept is enabling a blockchain-based system that could record changes to the conditions affecting and captured by sensors (i.e., smart objects) in a network and instrumentalize network relationships and the data that the network generates in order to exercise control over those nodes.

While working with Low-Power and Lossy Networks (LLNs), “routers and their interconnections are constrained” in terms of their “processing power, memory, and/or energy (battery), and their interconnections are characterized by, illustratively, high loss rates, low data rates, and/or instability.”

Additionally, “changing environmental conditions may also affect device communications.” As such, a system that enhances communications between these sensors and another device in the network could expand the number of practical LLN use cases.

In one embodiment, a device in a network receives a network registration request from a particular node. The device causes performance of a validation of the information about the particular node via comparison of the information about the particular node to a distributed block chain that includes information regarding the particular node and one or more other nodes.
 

About Cisco application

The application also lists “the smart grid, smart cities, and building and industrial automation” among the types of LLNs that might operate more efficiently with the integration of the invention.

The device causes an update to the block chain based on the information about the particular node and the validation of the information about the particular node. The device uses the updated block chain to control behavior of the particular node and the one or more other nodes.
 

About Cisco application

The smart objects/sensors that could, at least partially, comprise these networks include “lights, appliances, vehicles, HVAC (heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning), windows and window shades and blinds, doors, locks,” as well as actuators – automated devices that can, for instance, start an engine.

'Kodak Miner' Turned Out to be a Scam

KashMiner by Spotlite USA was promoted as Kodak branded bitcoin miner 
17 July 2018   143

The KashMiner bitcoin miner, exhibited at the Kodak stand during the CES technology show in Las Vegas, was in fact a product designed to mislead potential consumers and with a potentially unattainable potential return. This is reported by BBC.

Spotlite USA is licensed by Kodak's lighting division, which allows it to use the famous brand in its products. In January 2018 the company introduced its miner and announced that it intends to lease it. According to its business plan, potential users had to pay a commission before getting the device. It was expected that after depositing $ 3,400, the customer will receive a device that will allow him to easily cover expenses and receive revenue from bitcoin mining.

However the company did not have an official Kodak license to use the brand in the production of mining equipment and initially overstated the indicators of the potential profit of its device, refusing to take into account the growing complexity and costs of bitcoin mining. The advertising materials reported that KashMiner brings $ 375 a month, which, subject to a 2-year contract, would allow the client to receive $ 5,600 of profit after paying a commission. Experts from the industry of cryptocurrency call this offer a scam.

There is no way your magical Kodak miner will make the same $375 every month.
 

Saifedean Ammous

Economist

CEO Spotlite USA Halston Mikail previously reported that he plans to install hundreds of miners at the headquarters of Kodak. According to him, he already managed to place 80 miners there, but the Kodak spokesman denied this information.

While you saw units at CES from our licensee Spotlite, the KashMiner is not a Kodak brand licensed product. Units were not installed at our headquarters.
 

Kodak Spokesman

In a phone call with the BBC, Spotlite's Halston Mikail said the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) had prevented the scheme from going ahead.