Japanese Fujitsu tests cloud-based blockchain service

Japanese Fujitsu in partnership with other companies tests blockchain  platform for p2p-payments
13 October 2017   868

Japanese Fujitsu teams up with Mizuho, Sumitomo Mitsui and Mitsubishi UFJ Financial (MUFG- Japan’s largest bank) in order to conduct a joint field trial of a person-to-person money transfer service powered by blockchain technology. The trial will begin in January 2018 and last for about three months.

Money transfer service by Fujitsu
Image credit: Fujitsu

Thus, Fujitsu is to develop a "cloud-based blockchain platform for money transfers between individuals that can be jointly used by these three major banks, as well as a smartphone application that allows users to easily handle the different steps for sending money and for making deposits and withdrawals".

The company and the three major banks will verify that this system can seamlessly link a money transfer account for individuals set up on this platform with the user's actual bank account. The field trial will additionally confirm whether the new platform can accurately and securely handle a series of processes, including transferring value between money transfer accounts for individuals, as well as clearing and settlement.

Through this field trial, Fujitsu will work to develop a service platform that is highly convenient for users in an increasingly monetarily diverse, cashless society.

ICOs to Lose Popularity, Diar Research Say

Diar assumes that in the future unregulated ICOs won't attract significant attention
11 December 2018   26

Although since the beginning of this year, ICO-startups have managed to raise over $ 12.2 billion, the November figure was only $ 65 million, according to data from a new study of the Diar portal.

According to analysts, the once popular method of financing, which allowed startups to attract tens and hundreds of millions of dollars in the absence of any product, exhausted itself against the background of fears about regulators' actions and the general dynamics of the cryptocurrency market, which did not leave retail investors with anything except for an unpleasant aftertaste.

This version is also supported by the data from the TokenData portal, which Diar leads in his research. Even with respect to the October levels, which constituted only a small fraction of what could be collected a few months ago, the November figures were 3 times lower.

Diar assumes that in the future unregulated ICOs as we have known them over the past years will no longer attract significant attention and will give way to regulated platforms of tokenized securities.