Java 9 Hackday

Videocap of interantional, online Java 9 hackday, held by the JUG
21 August 2017   924

vJUG is the first online Java Users Group. It allows for anyone from everywhere in the world to join and discuss all Java related topics. JUG conducts Hackdays on a regular basis.

Some info about the participants:

  • Heather VanCura is the Chair of the Java Community Process (JCP) Program at Oracle, international speaker, leader of Global Adopt-a-JSR program in conjunction with Java User Group leaders, organizer of developer hack days (aka Hackergartens) around the world and Spec Lead of JSR 364, Broadening JCP Membership, through the JCP Program. Heather is passionate about growing Java technology and community building dynamics.
  • Mani Sarkar is a passionate developer mainly in the Java/JVM space, currently living and working in the UK. A member of the London Java Community (LJC), JCP Member, OpenJDK contributor (has been heavily involved with this project in the past), involved in number of developer communities, and F/OSS projects. He sees himself working in the areas of core Java, JVM, JDK, Hotspot, Nashorn and Performance Tuning. Advocate of a number of agile and software craftsmanship practices and a regular at many talks, conferences and hands-on-workshops. Expresses his thoughts often via blog posts, tweets and other forms of social media. He can be found on twitter at @theNeomatrix369.
  • Simon Maple is the Director of Developer Relations at ZeroTurnaround, a Java Champion since 2014, JavaOne Rockstar speaker in 2014, Duke's Choice award winner, Virtual JUG founder and organiser, London Java Community co-leader and RebelLabs author. He is an experienced speaker, having presented at JavaOne, JavaZone, Jfokus, DevoxxUK, DevoxxFR, JavaZone, JMaghreb and many more including many JUG tours. His passion is around user groups and communities. When not traveling, Simon enjoys spending quality time with his family, cooking and eating great food.
  • Pratik Patel is the CTO of Atlanta based TripLingo  and the president of Atlanta Java User’s Group. He has also spoken at various conferences and participates in several local tech groups and startup groups. He’s in the startup world now and hacks Java, iOS, Android, HTML5, CSS3, JavaScript, Rails, and ….. well everything except Perl. 

 

Canonical to Represent Minimal Ubuntu

New version of Ubuntu is created for servers, isolated containers based on Docker and cloud systems
12 July 2018   105

Ubuntu team presented a simplified version of the base image - Minimal Ubuntu. It is designed for servers, isolated containers based on Docker and cloud systems. The release features high performance, minimal load time and automation of applications in the cloud.

The small footprint of Minimal Ubuntu, when deployed with fast VM provisioning from GCE, helps deliver drastically improved boot times, making them a great choice for developers looking to build their applications on Google Cloud Platform.
 

Paul Nash

Group Product Manager, Google Cloud

The authors of the project emphasize the size of the distribution kit, which "weighs" 157 MB, and also supports the main cloud systems like Amazon EC2, Google Compute Engine (GCE), LXD and KVM / OpenStack, each of which has its own optimized version of the package. In addition, the OS-based image for operating with containers based on the Docker platform, compatible with the Kubernetes.

Minimal Ubuntu is designed for automated execution, so it includes only a minimal set of tools. The distribution can be upgraded to a set of Ubuntu Server packages using the special utility "unminimize", which returns components that are convenient for interactive management.

According to Canonical representatives, the deletion of the manual control functions resulted in the acceleration of the load time by 40% and the reduction of the occupied disk space by 50%. At the same time, this release remained completely compatible with all the packages from standard Ubuntu repositories. Required packages can be installed using the standard package manager apt or using snapd, which are included in the distribution by default.

Two assemblies are available for download, based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and 18.04 LTS. You can download them on the official website.