JetBrains to Roll Out Cloud Tools for InteliJ IDEA

The extension can use the services API directly from the IDE, add the appropriate Java client libraries, and manage the Google Cloud Platform accounts
01 August 2018   1008

The IntelliJ IDEA development environment is now able to directly access Google Cloud services with the new Cloud Tools plug-in. The extension can use the services API directly from the IDE, add the appropriate Java client libraries, and manage the Google Cloud Platform accounts.

The plugin allows you to log in to GCP directly from the development environment. This can be done through Tools> Google Cloud Tools> Add Cloud libraries ...:

Cloud Tools
Cloud Tools

In the window that appears, select the required API and your GCP project:

Cloud Tools
Cloud Tools

After clicking the Add Client Library button, a confirmation window will appear, notifying you of the API connection and creating an account in the service:

Cloud Tools
Cloud Tools

After confirmation, the plugin will offer the necessary environment variables:

Cloud Tools
Cloud Tools

The plugin can interact with the pom.xml file of the Maven framework. Cloud Tools adds missing client libraries to the file, writes Bill of Materials (BOM) to avoid version conflicts, identifies and processes configuration errors.

At the end of July 2018, JetBrains developers released version 2018.2 of the IntelliJ IDEA development environment, adding support for Java 11, Groovy 2.5 and 3.0.

Vulnerabilities to be Found in Android & Google Photo

As reported, they are already patched, but affected millions of users around the world
21 March 2019   75

Detected bugs in Android and Google Photos, which led to data leaks. They are already patched, but affected millions of users around the world.

The Android vulnerability was covered in the WebView component and affected all versions of Android from 4.4 and above. WebView allows you to embed web browsing into an Android application and was originally part of Chromium. This means that the vulnerability applies not only to the mobile version of Chrome, but to all Android browsers based on this engine.

Using a vulnerability in WebView, an attacker could gain access to user accounts, browser history and other data.

It turns out that the web version of the Google Photo service revealed user data when attacking via third-party channels. An attacker can get the metadata of the photos, as well as information about where the picture was taken.