Knot Server 2.8.2 to be Available

DNS server is focused on high-performance query processing, for which a multi-threaded and well-scalable on SMP systems, is used
07 June 2019   347

The release of KnotDNS 2.8.2, a high-performance authoritative DNS server (the recursor is designed as a separate application), supporting all modern DNS capabilities, is introduced. The project is being developed by the Czech CZ.NIC name registry, written in C and distributed under the GPLv3 license. The server is characterized by a focus on high-performance query processing, for which a multi-threaded and well-scalable on SMP systems, is used. Features include adding and deleting zones on the fly, zone transfer between servers, DDNS (dynamic updates), NSID (RFC 5001), extensions EDNS0 and DNSSEC (including NSEC3), response rate limits (RRL).

New features:

  • New blocking mode for zone event triggers in knotc
  • New weighted records mode in the module geoip (Thanks to Conrad Hoffmann)
  • Module noudp allows UDP allow rate configuration

And improvements:

  • NSEC3 salt lifetime can be set to infinity
  • New 'running' zone event status in the knotc output
  • Knotc in the forced mode returns failure also if zone check emits any warning
  • Ignoring PMTU information for IPv4/UDP via IP_PMTUDISC_OMIT (Thanks to Daisuke Higashi)
  • Various improvements in the documentation

Vulnerabilities in Linux & FreeBSD TCP Stacks Detected

There are four vulnerabilities, which are marked as critical by the specialists
18 June 2019   252

Netflix has identified several critical vulnerabilities in the Linux and FreeBSD TCP stacks that allow to remotely initiate a kernel crash or cause excessive resource consumption when processing specially crafted TCP packets (packet-of-death). Problems are caused by errors in the handlers of the maximum size of the data block in the TCP packet (MSS, Maximum segment size) and the mechanism for selective acknowledgment of connections (SACK, TCP Selective Acknowledgment).

CVE-2019-11477 A sequence of SACKs may be crafted such that one can trigger an integer overflow, leading to a kernel panic. 

Fragments are saved when a packet loss occurs or the need for selective retransmission of packets, if SACK is enabled and TSO is supported by the driver. With a minimum MSS, only 8 bytes are allocated for one data segment, respectively, the number of segments required to send all data increases, and the structure can reach a limit of 17 fragments. To protect against overflow, there is a check in the code that calls the BUG_ON () function and puts the kernel in the panic state.

CVE-2019-11478 (SACK Slowness) It is possible to send a crafted sequence of SACKs which will fragment the TCP retransmission queue. On Linux kernels prior to 4.15, an attacker may be able to further exploit the fragmented queue to cause an expensive linked-list walk for subsequent SACKs received for that same TCP connection.

CVE-2019-5599 (SACK Slowness) It is possible to send a crafted sequence of SACKs which will fragment the RACK send a map. An attacker may be able to further exploit the fragmented send map to cause an expensive linked-list walk for subsequent SACKs received for that same TCP connection.

CVE-2019-11479 -An attacker can force the Linux kernel to segment its responses into multiple TCP segments, each of which contains only 8 bytes of data. This drastically increases the bandwidth required to deliver the same amount of data. Further, it consumes additional resources (CPU and NIC processing power). This attack requires continued effort from the attacker and the impacts will end shortly after the attacker stops sending traffic.

Get more info on the vulnerabilities, walkarounds and fixes at openwall.