Ledger warns about Bitcoin Diamond scam

According to the Twitter of popular hardware wallet manufacturer, "multiple [scam] sites claim to let you collect Bitcoin Diamond"
26 December 2017   1009

The manufacturer of hardware wallets Ledger warned users about fraudulent schemes related to the hard fork of Bitcoin called Diamond (BCD). In particular, they are talking about sites that offer bitcoin holders to get BCD coins.

Bitcoin Diamond is one of the many forks of bitcoin, the creators of which announced their intention to issue a new crypto currency in November.

Details of the project, for the most part, are unknown, developers are feeding the public with vague promises to increase the speed of processing transactions, and futures for BCD traded on two dozen exchanges.

As Ledger informs, malefactors use trustfulness of bitcoin holders who technically have the right to receive equivalent balances in BCD, luring them to a lot of sites with the help of which it is supposedly possible to get a new crypto currency.

Some cryptocurrency enthusiasts even made a whole investigation regarding Bitcoin Diamond.

Bitcoin Diamond is unlike the previous forks of Bitcoin (Bitcoin Cash and Bitcoin Gold). Bitcoin Diamond is scam with huge red flags. Do not get scammed into buying Bitcoin Blood Diamonds.
 

bitcoinblooddiamond

For example, Medium blogger with nickname "bitcoinblooddiamond" reports on the lack of information about the team, no official Slack, poor Telegram channel, date of website registration (3rd November), anonymous team and other strage things. 

Bitcoin Questions included into Dutch High School Exam

Bitcoin-themed mathematics questions have been cut-in in recent high school matriculation exams in the Netherlands
18 May 2018   99

About 200,000 Dutch students are to have taken the OVW exam, a obligatory test for students who wish to get tertiary education in the Netherlands. The testing list  included five bitcoin-themed questions.

Students were offered to solve five different mathematical problems. The questions asked that students “calculate in what year the amount of bitcoin exceeded 18 million,” “calculate from which year on the reward will be less than one bitcoin,” “determine the maximal amount of bitcoin that can be in circulation.” The resolution  of the issues was supposed to base on the formula used to employed to solve the questions.

Such kind of changes in testing for students is connected with the growing  recognition of cryptocurrency by the Holland’s institutions. In March, the Court of Amsterdam defined that bitcoin owns “properties of wealth” at the same time  adjudicating a civil rights occasion between an individual seeking repayment from an unfulfilled contract pertaining to bitcoin mining. The court ordered that “bitcoin represents a value and is transferable” and “thus shows characteristics of a property right. A claim for payment in Bitcoin is, therefore, to be regarded as a claim that qualifies for verification.”

Recently, Rob van Gijzel, the ambassador of the Dutch Blockchain Coalition, revealed a national blockchain research agenda, which had been accredited by the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs and Climate Policy. The ministry had established a designated committee, TopTeam ICT, appointed to analyze the potential legal, economic, and ethical implications of distributed ledger technology in the country.