Linzhi ETH Miner Manufacturer to Oppose the ProgPoW

If the proposal is accepted, the impact of ASIC miners can be limited
09 January 2019   1379

Based in Shenzhen, the manufacturer of miners Linzhi criticized the intention of Ethereum-developers to implement a ProgPoW solution, aimed at blocking ASIC-miners. It is reported by CoinDesk.

The possibility of updating the Ethereum codebase with ProgPoW activation was discussed by developers last Friday. If the proposal is accepted, the influence of ASIC miners will be limited, and the ETH mining will continue to be carried out on more traditional equipment like video cards.

According to representatives of Linzhi, the company was "shocked" by this initiative:

We reject arbitrary enforcement of rules, and request clear and equal guidelines to be established for all hardware makers. Today we are calling upon the ethereum developers to publish rules and requirements for what constitutes a good ProgPoW ASIC maker. 
 

Linzhi Team

Currently, Linzhi is developing an innovative chip for the Ethash mining algorithm. The company has already spent $ 4 million on its creation, and Linzhi is confident that the miners based on these chips outperform all ASIC devices on the market for Ethereum.

In a conversation with CoinDesk, a spokesman for Linzhi, Wolfgang Sproul, announced the developers' intention to explore the possibility of creating an ASIC device compatible with the ProgPoW solution.

Exim Mail Servers to Undergo Massive Attacks

Hackers are using fixed vulnerability, which was found last week, but still more than 3.6M mail servers in the global network remain potentially vulnerable
14 June 2019   326

Cybereason security researchers warned mail server administrators about the discovery of a massive automated attack that exploits a critical vulnerability (CVE-2019-10149) of Exim that was discovered last week. During the attack, hackers seek to execute their code as root and install malware for mining cryptocurrency on the server.

According to the Shodan service, more than 3.6 million mail servers in the global network remain potentially vulnerable, and are not updated to the latest release of Exim 4.92. About 2 million potentially vulnerable servers are located in the USA, 192 thousand in Russia. According to RiskIQ, version 4.92 has already switched 70% of servers to Exim.

Vulnerable Exim Servers
Vulnerable Exim Servers

Administrators are advised to urgently install updates that were prepared last week (Debian, Ubuntu, openSUSE, Arch Linux, Fedora, EPEL for RHEL / CentOS). If there is a defeated version of Exim in the system (from 4.87 to 4.91 inclusive), you need to make sure that the system is no longer compromised by checking the crontab for suspicious calls and to ensure that there are no additional keys in the /root/.ssh directory. The attack can also be indicated by the presence in the log of the firewall of activity from the hosts an7kmd2wp4xo7hpr.tor2web.su, an7kmd2wp4xo7hpr.tor2web.io and an7kmd2wp4xo7hpr.onion.sh, which are used for during the malware download process.

The first attacks on Exim servers were recorded on June 9th. By June 13, the attack became widespread. After exploiting the vulnerabilities through the tor2web gateways, the Tor hidden service (an7kmd2wp4xo7hpr) downloads a script that checks for OpenSSH (if not installed), changes its settings (allows root login and key authentication) and sets the root user for the root user access to the system via SSH.

After setting up the backdoor, a port scanner is installed in the system to identify other vulnerable servers. It also searches the system for existing mining systems that are deleted if detected. At the last stage, the own miner is loaded and registered in the crontab. The miner is loaded under the guise of an ico-file (in fact, is a zip-archive with the password "no-password"), in which the executable file in ELF format for Linux with Glibc 2.7+ is packed.