Lite.IM Beta to be Released

Lite.IM will allow users to interact with Litecoin blockchain using text commands through a special API-system
09 August 2018   1018

Developers of the Zulu Republic blockchain project presented Lite.IM software that allows users to make transactions in the Litecoin network using SMS messages and the Telegram messenger.

Zulu Republic is convinced that Telegram is the safest messenger and provides all the necessary opportunities for testing the concept before launching SMS payments.

Representatives of the project emphasize that a lot of people live in countries with limited access to the Internet, under conditions of strict censorship by political regimes, without access to financial services. In addition, 64% of the world's population owns mobile phones, but only 33% have smartphones. This is the reason why Zulu Republic is convinced of the need to link SMS messages and Litecoin blockchain, not relying on the availability of the Internet.

By opening the world of cryptocurrency to these underserved and vulnerable populations, we aim to provide a degree of financial agency, autonomy, and (perhaps most importantly) security that they’ve been denied up until now.
 

Zulu Republic

Lite.IM will allow users to interact with Litecoin blockchain using text commands through a special API-system. At the moment the community already has the opportunity to use Telegram-bot to check balances and send Litecoin to LTC-addresses or e-mail. The solution is written on JavaScript. More info is available at GitHub.

The creator of "digital silver" Charlie Lee is convinced that the bear market allows us to focus on developing solutions for mass adoption of technology. 

Third Party Apps Could Read Twitter Messaging

According to the company, no one used this vulnerability and the issues is now solved
18 December 2018   691

Until the beginning of December, third-party applications could access Twitter private messages. According to the company, no one took advantage of this vulnerability. Terence Eden, who found it, was paid almost $ 3,000 under the Bug Bounty program.

In 2013, there was a leak of keys to the Twitter API - so applications could access the interface bypassing the social network. To protect users, Twitter implemented an application authorization mechanism through predefined addresses (Callback URL), but it didn’t suit everyone.

Applications that do not support Callback URLs could authenticate using PIN codes. With this authorization, a window pops up that lists which data the user opens to access. The window did not request access to private messages, but in fact the application received it.

On December 6, Twitter reported that it had solved the problem. Judging by the statement of the company on the HackerOne website, no one had time to take advantage of this vulnerability.

This is not the first social network security error related to the API. In September, Twitter discovered a bug in AAAPI (Account Activity API): the system sent a copy of the user's personal message to a random recipient.