Microsoft to Use Chromium for Edge Browser

The company has already placed the repository on GitHub to attract new members to the development of the browser
07 December 2018   538

Microsoft Vice President Joe Belfiore said that from December 6, 2018, the company will use the Chromium engine in the Microsoft Edge browser. According to him, Microsoft also plans to develop browsers for smartphones and other devices.

The company has already placed the repository on GitHub to attract new members to the development of the browser. Microsoft expects that the transition to the new engine will be a big step in the development of Microsoft Edge. For example, the browser will finally be adapted for macOS.

According to Belfiore, the company plans to improve the project in three areas:

  • Users will get hardware integration, improved browser compatibility with sites and reduced power consumption of devices when using it.
  • Web developers will appreciate the reduced fragmentation of a web platform for testing sites.
  • The corporate IT sector will get the compatibility of old and new Windows applications that run in the browser.

He noted that during the year the company would work “under the hood” of Microsoft Edge, and named several key stages of this process. For example, the transition to a platform compatible with the Chromium engine for developing a desktop version of the browser. It is also planned that most platforms and all versions of Windows will support Microsoft Edge.

Tiobe February 2019 Index Released

Groove language is in top 20 again; it's popularity increased due to Gradle; Java is 1st
11 February 2019   341

In February, search engine statistics showed that the dynamically typed Groovy language is gaining popularity again. As analysts of TIOBE noted, it was already in the top twenty of the TIOBE index in 2016 on the wave of interest in the Jenkins system for continuous integration. Now it is pushed forward by the Gradle assembly automation system.

TIOBE Februry 2019 Index
TIOBE Februry 2019 Index

More analysts noticed that the language Hack this month entered the top 50, and TypeScript left it (in their opinion, temporarily). Since February last year, Python and C ++ swapped places, and again topped the list with Java and C.