Monero Team to Kill Coin Burning Bug

A scenario of a hypothetical attack described by one of the participants of Monero's subreddit helped to identify the bug
26 September 2018   475

Developers of the Monero cryptocurrency have eliminated a bug that could allow intruders to "burn" funds in organizations' wallets, while sacrificing only a small amount in the form of transaction commissions. This is reported in the official announcement of the project.

A scenario of a hypothetical attack described by one of the participants of Monero's subreddit allowed to identify the bug.

Practically speaking this bug is exploited as follows. An attacker first generates a random private transaction key. Thereafter, they modify the code to merely use this particular private transaction key, which ensures multiple transactions to the same public address (e.g. an exchange's hot wallet) are sent to the same stealth address. Subsequently, they send, say, a thousand transactions of 1 XMR to an exchange. Because the exchange's wallet does not warn for this particular abnormality (i.e. funds being received on the same stealth address), the exchange will, as usual, credit the attacker with 1000 XMR. The attacker then sells his XMR for BTC and lastly withdraws this BTC. The result of the hacker's action(s) is that the exchange is left with 999 unspendable / burnt outputs of 1 XMR.
 

dEBRUYNE at Get Monero

Monero developers note that this method does not allow the attack organizer to directly receive the XMR coins deposited in this way. However, an attacker can withdraw XMR through bitcoins, and the exchange will remain with 999 non-consumable or "burned" outputs from 1 XMR.

The created fix was privately distributed to exchanges and large merchants, in order not to attract unnecessary attention to the time of elimination of problems. According to the developers, the exploit was not used to perform real attacks.

In early August, because of the critical bug in the code of Monero, which allows to manipulate the amount of transactions, Livecoin suffered losses exceeding $ 1.8 million.

Scammers to Replace MEGA Extension to Steal Crypto

MEGA is a popular file exchange service; scammers were able to replace its official Google Chrom extension
05 September 2018   911

The popular file-sharing service MEGA reported a hacker attack. Attackers managed to replace the official Chromme extension of the service and to collect data on users' crypto-currency wallets.

On 4 September 2018 at 14:30 UTC, an unknown attacker uploaded a trojaned version of MEGA's Chrome extension, version 3.39.4, to the Google Chrome webstore. Upon installation or autoupdate, it would ask for elevated permissions (Read and change all your data on the websites you visit) that MEGA's real extension does not require and would (if permissions were granted) exfiltrate credentials for sites including amazon.com, live.com, github.com, google.com (for webstore login), myetherwallet.com, mymonero.com, idex.market and HTTP POST requests to other sites, to a server located in Ukraine. Note that mega.nz credentials were not being exfiltrated.

MEGA Blog

Thus, attackers could get access to the popular cryptocurrency wallets MyEtherWallet and MyMonero. Also, users' funds on the decentralized IDEX exchange are under the thread too.

Representatives of the file sharing company stressed that the fake extension was replaced by a genuine one four hours after the substitution. And an hour later, Google reacted and removed the extension from the Chrome store. Note that at the time of publication, the MEGA extension for Chrome in the official store is still not available.

Earlier it was reported that users of MyEtherWallet, using the free VPN-plugin Hola, could become victims of a hacker attack.