NGINX to Release Unit 1.3 Beta

Developers expanded the ability to run web applications in Python, PHP, Perl, Ruby and Go
16 July 2018   1248

In open access, a beta version of the NGINX Unit 1.3 application server was released. Developers continued to expand the ability to run web applications in Python, PHP, Perl, Ruby and Go. The project code is written in C and is distributed under the Apache 2.0 license.

Features

Version 1.3 eliminates the problems with handling errors when installing HTTP connections.

Among other changes:

  • parameter max_body_size to limit the size of the body of the request;
  • new parameters for setting timeouts when setting up an HTTP connection:
         "settings": {
              "http": {
                  "header_read_timeout": 30,
                  "body_read_timeout": 30,
                  "send_timeout": 30,
                  "idle_timeout": 180,
                  "max_body_size": 8388608
              }
          },
  • automatic use of the Bundler where possible in the Ruby module;
  • http.Flusher interface in the module for the Go language;
  • The possibility of using characters in the UTF-8 encoding in the request headers.

The first version of the NGINX 1.1 application server was released in mid-April 2018. Under the control of NGINX Unit, several applications can be executed simultaneously in different programming languages, the startup parameters of which can be changed dynamically without the need to edit the configuration files and restart.

Meson 0.50 to be Available

The key development goal of Meson is to ensure a high speed of the assembly process, combined with convenience and ease of use
11 March 2019   168

The release of the Meson 0.50 build system is introduced, which is used to build projects such as X.Org Server, Mesa, Lighttpd, systemd, GStreamer, Wayland, GNOME and GTK +. Meson code is written in Python and comes under the Apache 2.0 license.

The key development goal of Meson is to ensure a high speed of the assembly process, combined with convenience and ease of use. Instead of the make utility, the Ninja toolkit is used in the default build, but other backends can also be used, such as xcode and VisualStudio. A multi-platform dependency handler is built into the system, allowing you to use Meson to build packages for distributions. The build rules are set in a simplified domain-specific language, are well readable and understandable to the user (according to the authors' idea, the developer should spend the least amount of time writing the rules).

Cross-compilation and build on Linux, macOS and Windows using GCC, Clang, Visual Studio and other compilers are supported. Building projects in various programming languages is possible, including C, C ++, Fortran, Java and Rust. An incremental build mode is supported, in which only components directly related to changes made since the last build are reassembled. Meson can be used to form repeatable assemblies, in which the launch of an assembly in different environments leads to the generation of completely identical executable files.