OKEx and Huobi-Pro P2P trade launch

While Huobi issues a farewell to Bitcoin industry, rumors about p2p Bitcoin trading with support for fiat currencies (and the yuan) are spreading confidently
30 October 2017   648

Chinese Bitcoin exchange Huobi issues a farewell to the industry as its shut down is planned for this Tuesday.

According to the exchange, Huobi China will "exercise full cessation of all digital assets against the yuan's trading business from 24:00, GMT+8" on October 31. Leon Li, the Founder of Huobi, claims that it would reimagine itself as an “integrated information and research service provider in the vertical field of Blockchain” dedicated to the Chinese market.

I believe that this is not only a milestone for Huobi but also a watershed in the history of Chinese digital assets and even a memorable day in the development of global digital assets.
 

Leon Li
Founder of Huobi

Still, there's a glimmer of hope.

According to local news feed on Twitter, the two umbrella exchanges, OKEx and Huobi-Pro, are “soon to launch” p2p Bitcoin trading with support for fiat currencies including the yuan.

While both OKEx and Huobi-Pro are international non-China based operations not subject to the domestic ban, the source speculates that through undisclosed mechanisms both could ultimately give access to Chinese traders.

In fact, OKEx itself somehow implies that "a New Era" is coming while announcing its future plans after the October 31 shutdown deadline.

We have nothing more to do but to wait, while the Chinese market situation is becoming more and more interesting. We'll keep you updated! 

Tesla's cloud account hacked to mine cryptocurrency

Independent security group discovered Tesla's cloud account being hacked and infected with a miner-virus
21 February 2018   23

Cryptocurrencies are on the rise and all sorts of shady characters are trying to get in with dubious methods. Recent string of hacking attacks is a perfect example. And now not only exchanges and users with their hard-earned coins are in danger, but also companies with large cloud infrastructure face the same threat.

RedLock, a security research firm, reports that electric car manufacturer Tesla's cloud account information has been leaked to the internet, which allowed hackers to access the company's cloud. It has been hacked and hardware infected with a miner virus called Stratum. The mining protocol masks itself with low CPU usage and obscuring the IP of the mining server.

Of course, RedLock immediately contacted Tesla with this information and the company quickly got to fixing the breach. Tesla's spokesperson assured us that customer personal information hasn't been compromised, and that the vulnerability was patched in a matter of hours. Only small test park of internally-used engineering sample cars has been impacted and no indication whatsoever discovered that actual customer cars have been compromised in any way.

It certanly looks possible, because according to the same RedLock Cloud Security Intelligence group mining profitability of Tesla's cloud is worth a lot more that all the customer data available could be sold for on the black market. This also isn't the first instance of such a hack with no data being stolen. In fact, hacks with intention of hijacking mining capacity has already targeted Gemalto, a world's largest SIM-card manufacturer, and Aviva, a British insurance company, just to name a few.