Oracle to Announce Java SE 11 & Java Development Kit 11

As reported, support for Java 8 will end in December 2020, and Java 10 won't receive any updates
27 September 2018   1311

Oracle developers announced the release of the Java 11 standard and its implementation of the JDK (Java Development Kit) with a long support period up to 2026. It is fully compatible with previous versions. Support for Java 8 will end in December 2020, and Java 10 won't receive any updates.

New in Java SE 11

  • Nest-Based Access Control system implemented
  • The .class format is complemented by the support for the CONSTANT_Dynamic forms, which are loaded by the creation of constants to the bootstrap method.
  • Added support for the latest version of the transport layer security protocol - TLS 1.3. It accelerates the loading of mobile web pages, and also filters out old, vulnerable cryptographic primitives, replacing them with more complex encryption algorithms.
  • Standardized support for the HTTP Client API, introduced in the Java 9 incubator.
  • Epsilon garbage collector is launched in a test mode.
  • The Java EE and CORBA modules are removed from the JDK and the Java SE platform, and the Nashorn engine and the Pack200 tools are declared obsolete.
  • The JavaFX module is excluded from the kernel and is shipped separately.
  • Existing APIs are updated to support the Unicode 10 format.
  • Added tools for streaming low-level data on errors and problems.
  • Added the ability to run single-file programs that contain the source code.

More information about the changes can be found on the Release Notes page of JDK 11.

The previous, intermediate version of the standard and JDK 10 came out in March 2018. A set of development tools has received three new variants of Java virtual machines, the sharing of application classes and the support of the experimental Just-in-Time compiler on Linux / x64.

Vulnerabilities to be Found in Android & Google Photo

As reported, they are already patched, but affected millions of users around the world
21 March 2019   138

Detected bugs in Android and Google Photos, which led to data leaks. They are already patched, but affected millions of users around the world.

The Android vulnerability was covered in the WebView component and affected all versions of Android from 4.4 and above. WebView allows you to embed web browsing into an Android application and was originally part of Chromium. This means that the vulnerability applies not only to the mobile version of Chrome, but to all Android browsers based on this engine.

Using a vulnerability in WebView, an attacker could gain access to user accounts, browser history and other data.

It turns out that the web version of the Google Photo service revealed user data when attacking via third-party channels. An attacker can get the metadata of the photos, as well as information about where the picture was taken.