Porosity, Ethereum decompiler, launched

Ethereum Virtual Machine gets its first decompiler for smart contracts
31 July 2017   1818
Ethereum

Is an open-source blockchain-based distributed computing platform featuring smart contract functionality, which facilitates online contractual agreements 

Ethereum smart contracts are code that is executed on every node of the decentralized Ethereum blockchain network. When connected together, they form the distributed applications powering an emerging “Internet of Value.” Contracts themselves are stored on the blockchain such that everyone can be certain they will generate the exact same output without relying on a central server (or single company) to own that application.

Blockchain

Distributed database that is used to maintain a continuously growing list of records, called blocks

Most Ethereum developers write smart contracts in Solidity, a high-level (human readable) programming language resembling JavaScript. The language is by far the most widely used. However, due to the perceived insecurity of Solidity, most tools have focused on scanning Solidity source code, which is assumed to be available. 

Once a smart contract is compiled to EVM bytecode and launched on the Ethereum network, however, there is currently no way to provably go back and ensure that code is safe. As new vulnerabilities are discovered, we cannot retroactively identify affected smart contracts unless the developers have retained their own source code or shared it with the world.

Porosity

Announced at the DefCon hacker conference in Las Vegas, the open-source EVM decompiler is to make it easier to identify bugs in Ethereum smart contracts and to let developers revert difficult to understand EVM bytecode back to its original state

Thus, Porosity claims to be the first decompiler that generates human-readable Solidity syntax smart contracts from any EVM bytecode. Now all contracts can be reviewed at any time. Once reversed, the code can be scanned to check for susceptibility to new attacks or to ensure adherence to changing best practices. Porosity removes a major roadblock to interacting with contracts of unknown origin and helps further the “trust but verify” blockchain thinking.

Porosity is the first decompiler that generates human-readable Solidity syntax smart contracts from Ethereum Virtual Machine bytecode.
 

Amber Baldet
JP Morgan blockchain lead

Porosity is also integrated with JP Morgan's open-source Quorum blockchain created for enterprise-grade solutions, and it will now be available on the bank's Github page.

Tested with the help of some of JP Morgan's own engineers, Porosity and Quorum are expected to be packaged together to help run real-time smart contract security checks. 

Porosity’s GitHub and whitepaper.

'Kodak Miner' Turned Out to be a Scam

KashMiner by Spotlite USA was promoted as Kodak branded bitcoin miner 
17 July 2018   117

The KashMiner bitcoin miner, exhibited at the Kodak stand during the CES technology show in Las Vegas, was in fact a product designed to mislead potential consumers and with a potentially unattainable potential return. This is reported by BBC.

Spotlite USA is licensed by Kodak's lighting division, which allows it to use the famous brand in its products. In January 2018 the company introduced its miner and announced that it intends to lease it. According to its business plan, potential users had to pay a commission before getting the device. It was expected that after depositing $ 3,400, the customer will receive a device that will allow him to easily cover expenses and receive revenue from bitcoin mining.

However the company did not have an official Kodak license to use the brand in the production of mining equipment and initially overstated the indicators of the potential profit of its device, refusing to take into account the growing complexity and costs of bitcoin mining. The advertising materials reported that KashMiner brings $ 375 a month, which, subject to a 2-year contract, would allow the client to receive $ 5,600 of profit after paying a commission. Experts from the industry of cryptocurrency call this offer a scam.

There is no way your magical Kodak miner will make the same $375 every month.
 

Saifedean Ammous

Economist

CEO Spotlite USA Halston Mikail previously reported that he plans to install hundreds of miners at the headquarters of Kodak. According to him, he already managed to place 80 miners there, but the Kodak spokesman denied this information.

While you saw units at CES from our licensee Spotlite, the KashMiner is not a Kodak brand licensed product. Units were not installed at our headquarters.
 

Kodak Spokesman

In a phone call with the BBC, Spotlite's Halston Mikail said the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) had prevented the scheme from going ahead.