Rule on Cryptocurrencies urged by India’s Supreme Court

Indian Government is aimed to set the control in the sphere of cryptocurrencies in the best interest of all the participants
10 April 2018   1588

The Reserve Bank of India since 2013 has been publishing warning recommendations about cryptocurrency. Nevertheless, the Governmental directions towards digital money would only relate on the swindlers and scammers who will flout the laws of the country.

Indian Ministry of Finance had also founded an inter-disciplinary committee, which  was also stated to examine the regulatory base with consideration to Virtual Currencies. The committee included representatives from different Government structures, especially stock exchange board of India and Reserve Bank of India (RBI).  

In the middle of 2017 bitcoin became extremely demanded because of the growth in price and huge benefits earned by the investors. Together with the bitcoin`s increased popularity, crimes and fraud also enlarged and then began the period of knocking the doors of Supreme Court by activists.

The first Public Interest Litigation (PIL) was offered up before the Supreme Court by Mr. Vijay Pal Dalmia Advocate, by way of Writ Petition filed under Article 32 of the Constitution seeking a ban on cryptocurrencies` sale and purchase (including bitcoin, litecoin, etc) in India. Finally the RBI instead of clarifying its position on the issue evasively replied while giving information about the appointment of Inter-Disciplinary Committee by the Ministry of Finance.

Two Public Interest Litigations (PIL) are waiting for adjudication before the Supreme Court since November 2017 and remarkably the Government has not revealed its stance before the Supreme Court whether it is in favor or against the Crypto ecosystem.

The new RBI notification severing fiat-crypto ties will probably be challenged in the Court of Law. Today the parties with contesting interests are face-to-face before the Supreme Court, a gavel stroke of which will determine the future of cryptocurrencies in India.

The atmosphere on the social media specifies that the Crypto community is hopeful of a postponement from the Supreme Court. And like in other statement of John McAfee, “You can’t stop things like Bitcoin. It will be everywhere and the world will have to readjust. World governments will have to readjust”.

Israeli BTC Investors to Face Catch 22

They need to pay taxes from Bitcoin investing in order to avoid their property arrest, but banks don't take their money due to AML issues
06 August 2019   185

Bitcoin investors in Israel are faced with the impossibility of paying taxes, as local banks refuse to accept funds received from the sale of cryptocurrencies because of the risks of money laundering and terrorist financing. About this writes the local edition of Haaretz on August 6.

Bitcoin is not recognized as a currency in Israel, therefore, individuals must pay 25% of the income from cryptocurrency trading to the treasury, and legal entities - 47%.

Investor Ron Gross told the publication that he acquired bitcoins in 2011 and reported his income to the tax office. In 2017, the bank that served Gross began to refuse to accept funds received from the sale of bitcoins. The investor met with representatives of the bank to demonstrate to them a 70-page history of bitcoin transactions as confirmation of the origin of the funds, but failed to convince them.

The tax authority is aware of the problem, but they say the ball isn’t in their courts. I’ve tried working with almost all the banks, but the minute they hear the word ‘Bitcoin’ they freeze up.
 

Ron Gross

Bitcoin investor from Israel

 

Since Gross was unable to pay taxes on time, his bank account, home, and even scooters were arrested. According to the investor, the tax authorities know about the problem, but can do nothing.

According to Haaretz, the tax office is aware of $ 86 million in unpaid taxes on income from cryptocurrency trading. It is possible that the real amount may be significantly higher.

Roy Arav, another Bitcoin investor, kept the proceeds from trading Bitcoin in an account with Israeli bank Discount under the control of the Bit2C exchange. The bank refuses to transfer money to Arava’s personal account under the pretext that its politicians forbid it to transfer funds related to virtual assets to client accounts due to the risks of money laundering and terrorist financing.

Arav also could not pay taxes and was forced to sue the bank. According to the investor, the authorities entered his position and granted him a deferral of time for the consideration of the claim.