Samsung to Create DRAM for AI Mobile Apps

The chip called LPDDR5 is created using a 10-nanometer process technology and has a capacity of 8 GB
20 July 2018   761

Samsung has completed the development and testing of a new memory module standard LPDDR5. The chip is created using a 10-nanometer process technology and has a capacity of 8 GB. LPDDR5 DRAM is planned to be used in the production of smartphones with support for mobile communication 5G, on-board electronics of cars, as well as solutions for AI based on mobile platforms.

One of the innovations of LPDDR5 technology is improved energy efficiency. According to the company, the chip consumes 30% less electricity compared to the previous generation of LPDDR4X memory chips. The number of memory banks (subsections of the DRAM cell) is increased from 8 to 16 to provide high speed with low power consumption. In active mode, the module lowers the operating voltage to synchronize with the application processing speed.

Also, the new chip implements an advanced "deep sleep mode" to reduce the power consumption level to half the level of "standby" in LPDDR4X memory modules.

In the new LPDDR5 chip, the data transfer rate is increased to 6400 Mbit / s, which is 1.5 times more than the last LPDDR4X chips. According to Samsung, the module allows to transfer the volume in 51.2 GB of data (14 films with the size of 3.7 GB each as a Full-HD) in just 1 second.

The chip is scheduled to be launched in mass production as soon as the LPDDR5 specification is approved.

Neural Network to Create Landscapes from Sketches

Nvidia created GauGAN model that uses generative-competitive neural networks to process segmented images and create beautiful landscapes from peoples' sketches
20 March 2019   150

At the GTC 2019 conference, NVIDIA presented a demo version of the GauGAN neural network, which can turn sketchy drawings into photorealistic images.

The GauGAN model, named after the famous artist Paul Gauguin, uses generative-competitive neural networks to process segmented images. The generator creates an image and transfers it to the discriminator trained in real photographs. He in turn pixel-by-pixel tells the generator what to fix and where.

Simply put, the principle of the neural network is similar to the coloring of the coloring, but instead of children's drawings, it produces beautiful landscapes. Its creators emphasize that it does not just glue pieces of images, but generates unique ones, like a real artist.

Among other things, the neural network is able to imitate the styles of various artists and change the times of the day and year in the image. It also generates realistic reflections on water surfaces, such as ponds and rivers.

So far, GauGAN is configured to work with landscapes, but the neural network architecture allows us to train it to create urban images as well. The source text of the report in PDF is available here.

GauGAN can be useful to both architects and city planners, and landscape designers with game developers. An AI that understands what the real world looks like will simplify the implementation of their ideas and help you quickly change them. Soon the neural network will be available on the AI ​​Playground.