Samsung to Create DRAM for AI Mobile Apps

The chip called LPDDR5 is created using a 10-nanometer process technology and has a capacity of 8 GB
20 July 2018   416

Samsung has completed the development and testing of a new memory module standard LPDDR5. The chip is created using a 10-nanometer process technology and has a capacity of 8 GB. LPDDR5 DRAM is planned to be used in the production of smartphones with support for mobile communication 5G, on-board electronics of cars, as well as solutions for AI based on mobile platforms.

One of the innovations of LPDDR5 technology is improved energy efficiency. According to the company, the chip consumes 30% less electricity compared to the previous generation of LPDDR4X memory chips. The number of memory banks (subsections of the DRAM cell) is increased from 8 to 16 to provide high speed with low power consumption. In active mode, the module lowers the operating voltage to synchronize with the application processing speed.

Also, the new chip implements an advanced "deep sleep mode" to reduce the power consumption level to half the level of "standby" in LPDDR4X memory modules.

In the new LPDDR5 chip, the data transfer rate is increased to 6400 Mbit / s, which is 1.5 times more than the last LPDDR4X chips. According to Samsung, the module allows to transfer the volume in 51.2 GB of data (14 films with the size of 3.7 GB each as a Full-HD) in just 1 second.

The chip is scheduled to be launched in mass production as soon as the LPDDR5 specification is approved.

AI to Predict Parkinson

Looks like artifical intelligece can be used for really important things
16 November 2018   50

In Oxford, an AI-framework for the diagnosis of nystagmus is created - an early symptom of neurodegenerative pathologies, such as Parkinson's disease. Nystagmus is a form of sleep disturbance, a series of involuntary rapid tremors in the eyeballs of a sleeping person. Rapid diagnosis of nystagmus will allow to treat Parkinson’s disease at an early stage.

The researchers used data from 53 patients from an open laboratory database of the Montreal Sleep Research Archive. Records of electrical activity of the brain, skeletal muscles and eye movements were processed using the algorithm of regression decision trees (random forest).

As the main symptom of nystagmus and the approaching Parkinson's disease, researchers considered muscle atony. In total, electrograms identified 156 different features that can indicate the development of pathology.

Scientists used manual and automatic markup methods for a data set. With manual marking, they managed to achieve diagnostic accuracy of 96%, with automatic results being 4% worse. The researchers plan to improve the results of automatic processing using mathematical functions that mimic the behavior of brain neurons.

A month before the publication of the work of experts at Oxford University, scientists from the Swiss Institute of IRIS reported on the results of work on their own system for diagnosing neuropathology. The fundamental difference is that the Swiss system uses data collected using a smartphone, and the development from Oxford relies on special medical tests.