SEC Chief to Believe That Not All ICOs Are Fraud

Jay Clayton talked with Princeton students on the topic "Cryptocurrency and Initial Coin Offerings"
06 April 2018   1694

Speaking at an event at Princeton University, the chairman of the US Securities and Exchange Commission, Jay Clayton, in response to a question whether all ICOs are fraud, said that it was "absolutely not".

According to Clayton, the measures his agency is taking in recent months should help the development of crypto industry.

Is the approach taken in Washington by the SEC adversely affecting distributed ledger technology in other areas? My quick answer is that my hope is that it's actually helping - because this technology is being used for fraud and to the extent that it's being used for fraud, history shows that government comes down harshly on that technology later.
 

Jay Clayton

Chief, SEC

One of the problems that regulators see in this area, according to Clayton, is to attempt to classify the ICO tokens as utility tokens, which, according to the idea of ​​the organizers of such campaigns, should free them from the obligation to comply with the requirements of the securities law. At the same time, in fact most of these tokens have the characteristics of securities.

If a startup "offering something that depends on the efforts of others, it should be regulated as a security" Clayton said.

If I have a laundry token for washing my clothes, that's not a security. But if I have a set of 10 laundry tokens and the laundromats are to be developed and those are offered to me as something I can use for the future and I'm buying them because I can sell them to next year's incoming class, that's a security. What we find in the regulatory world [is that] the use of a laundry token evolves over time. The use can evolve toward or away from a security. We found that the areas of application of laundry tokens can change over time, both in the direction of acquiring the qualities of a security, and in the opposite direction. 
 

Jay Clayton

Chief, SEC

Nations may experiment with sovereign cryptocurrencies, while startups might develop different kinds applications with the underlying technology, he added.

SEC to Accuse Veritaseum ICO of Fraud

SEC believes that project's tokensale, thru which it raised $14.8M back in 2017-2018 had a signs of scam and company misled the investors
14 August 2019   235

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has sued New Yorker  and Veritaseum-related companies that have been caught by the agency in conducting an unregistered ICO with signs of fraud. It is reported by Cointelegraph.

According to documents published on the network, the SEC intends to hold Reggie Middleton accountable and immediately freeze the assets of Veritaseum Inc. and Veritaseum LLC.

The Commission claims that the defendants raised about $ 14.8 million through an initial coin offering (ICO) in 2017 - early 2018. At the same time, many investors were misled, as the company distorted information about the conditions of the token sale and deliberately hid some significant details.

The American regulator claims that the project still has about $ 8 million of illegally raised funds. According to the SEC, these assets must be frozen immediately.

Amid this news, the Veritaseum (VERI) rate has fallen by 70%. Now the coin is trading near the $ 5 mark, although at the beginning of 2018 its rate was approaching $ 500.

Veritaseum was created as a financial p2p platform, involving the movement of capital without traditional intermediaries. Also, VERI was positioned as a utility token for use in consulting services and access to various research works.

In 2017, Veritaseum blockchain startup fell victim to hackers, having lost $ 8.4 million from ICO investors.