Students to Beat Google’s Machine-Learning Code

Student programmers' image classification algorithm successfully identifies the object in 93% of cases
13 August 2018   1386

Developers-students from Fast.ai which organize free online computer training courses have created an image classification algorithm that successfully identifies the object in 93% of cases and copes with it faster than a similar Google algorithm with a similar configuration. The authors argue that "the creation of breakthrough technologies is not just for big companies". This is reported by MIT Technology Review.

When evaluating performance, the DAWNBench test was used, which calculates the speed and cost of teaching the neural network. During the Fast.ai experiment, the neural network was launched on 16 virtual AWS nodes, each contained 8 NVIDIA V100 graphics cards. This configuration achieved accuracy of 93% in 18 minutes, and the cost of machine time was estimated at $ 40. The result of Fast.ai is faster than the development of Google engineers by 40%, but the corporation uses its own clusters TPU Pod, so the comparison is not entirely objective.

The developers used the PyTorch Python library, as well as their own development - fastai. They were able to achieve this learning speed with the new method of cropping images from the ImageNet dataset: instead of square pictures, they began to use rectangular:

Fast AI
Fast AI

State-of-the-art results are not the exclusive domain of big companies. These are the obvious, dumb things that many researchers wouldn’t even think to do.
 

Jeremy Howard

Founder, Fast.AI

The authors tried to make the project accessible to everyone, so they simplified its infrastructure, refusing to use distributed computing systems and containers. To implement it, developers teamed up with engineers from the innovative division of the Pentagon (DIU) to release software to quickly create and support distributed models on AWS. 

Nvidia to Open SPADE Source Code

SPADE machine learning system creates realistic landscapes based on rough human sketches
15 April 2019   674

NVIDIA has released the source code for the SPADE machine learning system (GauGAN), which allows for the synthesis of realistic landscapes based on rough sketches, as well as training models associated with the project. The system was demonstrated in March at the GTC 2019 conference, but the code was published only yesterday. The developments are open under the non-free license CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 (Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0), allowing use only for non-commercial purposes. The code is written in Python using the PyTorch framework.

Sketches are drawn up in the form of a segmented map that determines the placement of exemplary objects on the scene. The nature of the generated objects is set using color labels. For example, a blue fill turns into sky, blue into water, dark green into trees, light green into grass, light brown into stones, dark brown into mountains, gray into snow, a brown line into a road, and a blue line into the river. Additionally, based on the choice of reference images, the overall style of the composition and the time of day are determined. The proposed tool for creating virtual worlds can be useful to a wide range of specialists, from architects and urban planners to game developers and landscape designers.

Objects are synthesized by a generative-adversarial neural network (GAN), which, based on a schematic segmented map, creates realistic images by borrowing parts from a model previously trained on several million photographs. In contrast to the previously developed systems of image synthesis, the proposed method is based on the use of adaptive spatial transformation followed by transformation based on machine learning. Processing a segmented map instead of semantic markup allows you to achieve an exact match of the result and control the style.

To achieve realism, two competing neural networks are used: the generator and the discriminator (Discriminator). The generator generates images based on mixing elements of real photos, and the discriminator identifies possible deviations from real images. As a result, a feedback is formed, on the basis of which the generator begins to assemble more and more qualitative samples, until the discriminator ceases to distinguish them from the real ones.