SurBTC leaves SegWit2x agreement

Yet another cryptocurrency exchange, Chile's SurBTC, leaves SegWit2x agreement
12 October 2017   2223

Yet another cryptocurrency exchange leaves SegWit2x agreement.

This time this is the Latin American Bitcoin exchange, SurBTC, refused to support SegWit2x just a month before the planned November hardfork. 

The company claims that the new hardfork could be unsafe and is not supported by the Bitcoin Core developers. Indeed, Bitcoin.org has just published a “blacklist” of websites that continue to support the SegWit2x hardfork, arguing that storing any BTC on such services is strongly not recommended. 

We’ve always loved SegWit and we see a small increment (2mb) in the size of the block as a good idea as it would relieve pressure, lower fees and give some time to other more definitive scaling alternatives such as the Lightning Network to develop. Nevertheless, we can’t pretend to be bitcoin “scaling experts”. We don’t believe in trying to force a change bitcoin’s core developers don’t feel safe with.
 

Agustin Feuerhake
SurBTC team

The company also highlights that they haven’t seen proper support and they "don’t like what they currently see on the btc1 code repository in terms of technical considerations and open source collaboration".

SurBTC argues to be defending the interests of a growing Latin American user community that feels strongly against a new contentious hardfork. Thus, if the hardfork does happen, the exchange could eventually list both assets but will allow for sure its users to at least withdraw both. Due to practical reasons, SurBTC will continue to list BTC, and they will incorporate B2X (or the names that catch on among the industry) later.

Chinese Miners to Fall Victims of Ransomware

Looks like ransomware came together with "improved" firmware, that should "overclock" device
21 January 2019   79

In China, a ransomware spreads, victims of which are Bitcoin miners. The damage from its activities is measured in tens of thousands of dollars. This is reported by Trustnodes.

The virus infects miners, released by Bitmain, and requires you to send 10 bitcoins, otherwise threatening to cause overheating of the device.

The problem is solved by formatting the SD card of the infected device, however, as Trustnodes notes, the whole process can take up to four days, while malicious software rapidly spreads to the other miners.

Compromised device
Compromised device

Probably, the virus comes with an "improved" firmware for miners. Some owners install such firmware to “overclock” their ASIC devices and improve their performance.

The first messages about the virus refer to August last year. In particular, Antminer S9, T9 and even L3 + for Litecoin were attacked. Over time, the malware has been improved. Now its distributor himself can decide when to display a message requesting a ransom. One miner also said that one night the address to which the 4,000 devices belonging to him sent the mined cryptocurrency was changed to the address of the hacker, which brought him $ 8,000.