Using minikube for Local Node.js Development

Troy Connor, Cloud Software Developer for CloudReach talks about Kubernetes in the background of Node.js development
27 October 2017   2330

Learning Kubernetes is hard. Learning how to set up Kubernetes even harder. Developers have to provision a cluster from a cloud provider and have to start paying for that immediately. This can discourage developers who want to build scalable microservices. On big teams, usually, developers have a DevOps team who can take care of scalability and optimization.

When breaking apart monolithic applications, microservices will have to scale to handle the load of the incoming requests. As the application grows, so will the need for the microservices. When developing their applications, developers can run into the problem where it doesn’t work in different environments. The phrase “It works on my machine” points fingers at a bigger problem. Developers can find this frustrating and it slows down updates to the application. The developer’s workflow can prevent this by using minikube.

For large enterprise applications who use the cloud as their platform, Kubernetes has been one of the many solutions to these issues. Quickly deploy, scale, and modernize your microservices with simple commands. Minikube allows you to test this functionality without the cloud provider. As a NodeJS developer, having the functionality to develop a workflow that you would use for your production application is very valuable.

In this talk we will discuss what Kubernetes is, we will discuss the advantages of using minikube, and we will show the functionality of what Kubernetes can do with NodeJS. We will show how to scale your application, how to deploy multiple copies of your application based on metrics, and show how to master blue/green deployments to not lose any uptime during updating your application.

Visual Studio Code 1.30 Released

The solution has received new features, as well as improved support for JavaScript and TypeScript
14 December 2018   39

Microsoft has released the development environment Visual Studio Code 1.30. The tool has received new features, as well as improved support for JavaScript and TypeScript.

The search tool in the new version of the editor allows you to make multi-line queries. You can add a new line to the query by pressing Shift + Enter or simply by pasting text from the clipboard.

Custom headers and menu items in Linux are now activated by default. Since some menus may go beyond the boundaries of the screen, the developers added the ability to scroll.

Menu items designed to work with the settings have been moved to the title bar of the editor.

In the snippet, new comment variables are implemented, allowing to leave lines or blocks of notes based on the language of the code.

Also, the developers added the Go to Declaration and Peek Declaration commands to Visual Studio Code 1.30 in addition to the existing Go to Definition and Peek Definition. This is due to the fact that in some languages ​​the concepts of definition and declaration are fundamentally different.

In Visual Studio Code 1.30, you can work with TypeScript 3.2.2. Display of callbacks in JavaScript and TypeScript is improved. The new version of the editor displays which function they belong to.

The developers have improved the integration with the repository. In the new version of the program, you can change the tool that opens the file by clicking on the version control panel.

The Visual Studio Code 1.30 error detection and removal tool allows you to delete debug consoles for inactive sessions. Improved concept of variable substitution in launch.json configuration. The initial debug configuration itself has been simplified by hiding minor elements and adding a Quick Pick interface.

You can set the task to run automatically when you open the project folder. In addition, several new tasks have been added to the task management command section, for example, Tasks: Rerun Last Task, which allows you to restart the previous process.