What is Browsh?

Overview of an interesting text-based web browser
10 July 2018   983

Browsh is a fully-modern text-based browser. It renders anything that a modern browser can; HTML5, CSS3, JS, video and even WebGL. It can be used from a terminal or from within a normal browser. Its main purpose is to significantly reduce bandwidth and thus both increase browsing speeds and decrease bandwidth costs.

Browsh
Browsh

This how developers reply to the question: "Why?"

Not all the world has good Internet.

If all you have is a 3kbps connection tethered from a phone then it's good to SSH into a server and browse the web through, say, elinks. That way the server downloads the web pages and uses the limited bandwidth of an SSH connection to display the result. But traditional text-based browsers lack JS support and all that other modern HTML5 goodness. Browsh is different in that it's backed by a real browser, namely headless Firefox, and uses that to create purely text-based version of web pages and web apps that can be easily rendered in a terminal or indeed, somewhat ironically, in another browser. Though note that currently the browser client doesn't have feature parity with the terminal client.

Why not VNC? Well VNC is certainly one solution but it doesn't quite have the same ability to deal with extremely bad Internet. Also, terminal Browsh can use MoSH to further reduce bandwidth and increase stability of the connection. Mosh offers features like automatic reconnection of dropped or roamed connections and diff-only screen updates. Furthermore, other than SSH or MoSH, terminal Browsh doesn't require a client like VNC.

One final reason to use terminal Browsh could be to offload the battery-drain of a modern browser from your laptop or low-powered device like a Raspberry Pi. If you're a CLI-native, then you could potentially get a few more hours life if your CPU-hungry browser is running somewhere else on mains electricity.

Get more info at GitHub.

Ring UI 1.0 Library Released

Learn about new features and improvements of Jet Brains' open source library
28 September 2018   944

JetBrains told about the release of the Ring UI 1.0 library. Updates have affected the support of Babel 7, the finalization of the visual language, customizable CSS properties, and the library home page has moved.

In addition, in the new version, the developers did:

  • most components moved to CSS;
  • "pop-up messages", "tabs" and "buttons-switches" components;
  • the ability to configure the list of browsers in which the application will work, thanks to the support of Babel 7.

Colors from the Ring UI can be used for the harmonious design of their application. To do this, you need to configure PostCSS as follows:

plugins: [
  ...
  require('postcss-custom-properties')({
    preserve: true,
    variables: require('@jetbrains/ring-ui/extract-css-vars')
  })
]

Changes in the visual language look like this:

Ring UI
Ring UI

At the end of July 2018, the company reported that its products would not support legacy license servers. Changes were made to the development environments of versions 2018.2.1 and .NET 2018.3 tools.