What is Browsh?

Overview of an interesting text-based web browser
10 July 2018   2062

Browsh is a fully-modern text-based browser. It renders anything that a modern browser can; HTML5, CSS3, JS, video and even WebGL. It can be used from a terminal or from within a normal browser. Its main purpose is to significantly reduce bandwidth and thus both increase browsing speeds and decrease bandwidth costs.

Browsh
Browsh

This how developers reply to the question: "Why?"

Not all the world has good Internet.

If all you have is a 3kbps connection tethered from a phone then it's good to SSH into a server and browse the web through, say, elinks. That way the server downloads the web pages and uses the limited bandwidth of an SSH connection to display the result. But traditional text-based browsers lack JS support and all that other modern HTML5 goodness. Browsh is different in that it's backed by a real browser, namely headless Firefox, and uses that to create purely text-based version of web pages and web apps that can be easily rendered in a terminal or indeed, somewhat ironically, in another browser. Though note that currently the browser client doesn't have feature parity with the terminal client.

Why not VNC? Well VNC is certainly one solution but it doesn't quite have the same ability to deal with extremely bad Internet. Also, terminal Browsh can use MoSH to further reduce bandwidth and increase stability of the connection. Mosh offers features like automatic reconnection of dropped or roamed connections and diff-only screen updates. Furthermore, other than SSH or MoSH, terminal Browsh doesn't require a client like VNC.

One final reason to use terminal Browsh could be to offload the battery-drain of a modern browser from your laptop or low-powered device like a Raspberry Pi. If you're a CLI-native, then you could potentially get a few more hours life if your CPU-hungry browser is running somewhere else on mains electricity.

Get more info at GitHub.

Frontend News Digest 3 -9.08

Learn this week's latest news and updates of JavaScript, CSS, PHP and related technologies
08 August 2019   550

Greetings! I hope your week went great! Here's new Frontend news digest.

In this digest, you will learn how to improve your procedural code, how to deploy apps to to IBM cloud with Tekton, how to use Immer to manage your React state and much more!

Guides

  • Trigger Firebase Storage Image Resize with Cloud Functions

Tutorial on creating an imager resizer triggered by Firebase Storage

  • Using pipe and compose to improve procedural code

According to the creator, this guide will sohw you how to use pipe and compose to improve the way we write procedural code.

  • Deploying Applications to IBM Cloud Kubernetes via Tekton

This article talks about Tekton, an open-source framework for creating CI/CD systems, and explains how to deploy and use it on the IBM Cloud Kubernetes service

  • Quick Gulp Cache Busting

This tips will allow you to improve your work with Gulp

  • Using Immer for React State Management

Learn how Immer can help you to operate React states

Article

  • Laravel Cloud Source Code on GitHub

Author believes that is a chance to get a glimpse of an application written by the creator of Laravel

Updates

  • Calendario

Library allowing to create flexible calendars

  • Symphony

According to the creators, 113 pull requests were merged (79 in code and 34 in docs) and 55 issues were closed (43 in code and 12 in docs)

Video

  • The Date Object - Getting, Setting & Formatting Dates in JavaScript - Tutorial

  • Simple Slide Show in JavaScript | JavaScript exercises