What is Puppeteer?

Short overview of Chrome team developed Node library which provides a high-level API to control headless Chrome over the DevTools Protocol
17 October 2017   1971

Puppeteer is a Node library which provides a high-level API to control headless Chrome over the DevTools Protocol. It can also be configured to use full (non-headless) Chrome.

What can it do? 

Most things that you can do manually in the browser can be done using Puppeteer! Here are a few examples to get you started:

  • Generate screenshots and PDFs of pages.
  • Crawl a SPA and generate pre-rendered content (i.e. "SSR").
  • Scrape content from websites.
  • Automate form submission, UI testing, keyboard input, etc.
  • Create an up-to-date, automated testing environment. Run your tests directly in the latest version of Chrome using the latest JavaScript and browser features.
  • Capture a timeline trace of your site to help diagnose performance issues. 

The goals of the project are simple:

  • Provide a slim, canonical library that highlights the capabilities of the DevTools Protocol.
  • Provide a reference implementation for similar testing libraries. Eventually, these other frameworks could adopt Puppeteer as their foundational layer.
  • Grow the adoption of headless/automated browser testing.
  • Help dogfood new DevTools Protocol features...and catch bugs!
  • Learn more about the pain points of automated browser testing and help fill those gaps.

Project is maintained by Chrome DevTools team. Learn more at GitHub and try it out on official website.  

What's new in IntelliJ IDEA 2018.2?

New version of popular IDE improved Spring and Spring Boot support
18 July 2018   104

The new version of IDE IntelliJ IDEA from JetBrains under the number 2018.2 has introduced several functions for developers using Spring and Spring Boot frameworks. Among the innovations: support for Spring Integration, runtime diagrams, library bin management and many minor fixes and improvements.

New features of IntelliJ IDEA

Now you can visualize the components in the system using the new Spring Integration diagram. All versions above 5.0 are supported.

Spring Integratio Diagram
Spring Integration Diagram

It shows all the gateways, channels and bridges of the application, regardless of whether they are configured using Java or XML annotations.

The IDE also received code completion and navigation for such integration annotations as @BridgeTo/From and @EnablePublisher:

Integration Annotations
Integration Annotations

In the new version of IntelliJ IDEA, you can view the dependencies during the execution of the Spring Boot application as a diagram through the control panel. To do this, go to the "Endpoints" section and enable the "Diagram Mode" function:

Runtime Dependencies
Runtime Dependencies

If there are too many beans in the project, the non-user codes can be disabled using the new "Show / Hide Library Beans" switch:

Show / Hide library beans
Show / Hide library beans

In addition, in 2018.2, you can start, modify, and test the display of HTTP requests in the "Endpoints" tab:

HTTP request
HTTP request

A complete list of improvements and changes is available in the technical update document. According to the developers, a lot of work has been done to improve performance in large projects.