What is Java XSON?

Overview of high-performance Java serialization framework
11 August 2017   2556

XSON is a Java object serialization and deserialization framework. It supports the serialization of Java objects into byte arrays and deserialization from byte arrays to Java objects. 

XSOM Scheme
XSOM Scheme

Recently, a new version was released. Let's see what's inside!

  1. The new buffer package, the relevant class in this package, provides the allocation of the byte [] in the process of distribution, use, recycling management; further providing serialization speed and reducing the Full GC.
  2. Provides API support with offset content.
  3. Provides XCO object serialization and deserialization support.
  4. Provide support for extended configuration files.

Let's check how to use it with code for some basic stuff.

Add the dependency.

<dependency>
    <groupId>org.xson</groupId>
    <artifactId>xson</artifactId>
    <version>1.0.2</version>
</dependency>

Serialization

User user = new User();
// set...
byte[] data = XSON.encode(user);

Deserialization

// byte[] data
User user = XSON.decode(data);

Serialization and deserialization with offset content

int x = 6;
User user = new User();
// set...
byte[] data = XSON.encode(x, user);
// byte[] data
User user = XSON.decode(x, data);

Learn more about XSON at GitHub or official website

Tiobe February 2019 Index Released

Groove language is in top 20 again; it's popularity increased due to Gradle; Java is 1st
11 February 2019   322

In February, search engine statistics showed that the dynamically typed Groovy language is gaining popularity again. As analysts of TIOBE noted, it was already in the top twenty of the TIOBE index in 2016 on the wave of interest in the Jenkins system for continuous integration. Now it is pushed forward by the Gradle assembly automation system.

TIOBE Februry 2019 Index
TIOBE Februry 2019 Index

More analysts noticed that the language Hack this month entered the top 50, and TypeScript left it (in their opinion, temporarily). Since February last year, Python and C ++ swapped places, and again topped the list with Java and C.