WireGuard to Create Zinc Cryptography Library

It is expected that after the introduction of library into the main Linux kernel, it will accelerate the process of data encryption
03 August 2018   556

The developers of the VPN protocol WireGuard announced the creation of the Zinc cryptographic library. It is expected that after the introduction of WireGuard into the main Linux kernel, it will accelerate the process of data encryption due to a simplified set of crypto algorithms.

The Zinc library consists of all cryptographic primitives used in WireGuard, assembled in a simplified form. Its task is to increase the performance of data encryption and fast execution of SIMD instructions.

Unlike the CryptoAPI interface used in the current Linux kernel, WireGuard with the Zinc library offers a simplified set of ready-made functions. They can only be used for their intended purpose, which eliminates the appearance of superfluous high-level abstractions. It is believed that the incorrect use of functions is the main source of problems in the development of applications.

Zinc offers the following cryptographic primitives:

  • stream ciphers ChaCha20 and HChaCha20;
  • technology for authentication of Poly1305 messages;
  • function Curve25519 with the Diffie-Hellman protocol to create a private key;
  • hash function BLAKE2s with a performance at MD5;
  • encryption mechanisms ChaCha20-Poly1305 and XChaCha20-Poly1305.

In July 2018, the expert on cryptography Daniel J. Bernstein (Daniel J. Bernstein) published the djbsort library. It is designed for cryptographic systems and encryption algorithms and speeds up the sorting of arrays of integers.

Linux Code of Conduct to Get Updates

Code of Conduct was designed to establish the rules and boundaries of relationships between developers of Linux
22 October 2018   70

In September 2018, the Linux-community was presented with a Code of Conduct (CoC) - a set of rules governing interpersonal relations between employees and aimed at preventing conflicts on the basis of disagreements during the work process. Although the document seemed quite controversial to the public, its immediate changes were not expected until the release of the stable version of the Linux kernel 4.19. Greg Kroa-Hartman, the accompanying Linux kernel developer, based on the feedback and complaints of his employees, combined them and outlined the most important ideas for changing the CoC.

One of the main proposals was the development of a document explaining some details of the CoC. Innovations also require employees in the event of a controversial situation to apply now to the Code of Conduct Committee, rather than to the Linux Foundation Technical Advisory Board.

Another important update is the emergence of a mediator in Linux kernel conflicts. SFLC’s legal director, Misha Chowdhary, was appointed to this position.

The remaining changes can be viewed in the archive of developers of the Linux kernel. It is expected that the innovations will be implemented with the release of the stable Linux kernel version 4.19.0. The developers also created a CoC webpage.

CoC is designed to establish the rules and boundaries of relationships between developers of Linux. Linus Torvalds established the Code of Conduct and explained the decision by the fact that it is impossible to objectively reach a common decision in the discussion on norms of behavior.