The world’s first 1GB block mined

The world's first 1.0001GB block has been mined on the Bitcoin Unlimited test network
17 October 2017   635

Bitcoin Unlimited chief scientist, Peter Rizun, reveales that the first 1.0001GB block was mined on a Gigablock testnet. It goes without saying, that the event marks a significant milestone for the big block project backed by the University of British Colombia, Nchain, and the Bitcoin Unlimited development team.

Thus, the current initiative puts scalability to the test by experimenting with much larger blocks to improve blockchain transaction congestion. For instance, both BU and Nchain have been testing larger blocks already in two separate projects: Nchain has been testing 32MB blocks, while BU’s “nolnet” network built by Andrew Stone has experimented with 64MB blocks.      

The development teams believes that increasing the block size limit from 1MB to much larger blocks will significantly reduce high fees and transaction bottleneck. The Gigablock testnet project has very ambitious goals as it aims to create a network that can handle Visa-level transaction throughput (3,000 TPS).

Noteworthy, after testing the Gigablock trial’s findings will be published within the Bitcoin community, the technology may be applied to the Bitcoin Cash network in the future.

Bank of China Filed a Patent to Scale Blockchain Systems

Bank of China has filed a patent application for a process able to scale blockchain systems  
23 February 2018   109

According to a document released by China's State Intellectual Property Office (SIPO) on February 23, the application was invented by Zhao Shuxiang and first submitted on September 28 last year.

The application states that instead of letting a new block store transactions from its previous one, a data compressing system could be used to pack transactions from multiple blocks into what the patent calls a "data block."

For example, when the system receives a request to compress transactions from block 1 to 1,000, it causes a new data block to be formed and temporarily hosted on a different storage system. Then, the system will run the packed data through a hash function with a hash value. After that, the compression system will attach labels in order to identify blocks on the blockchain.

With the use of the described method, the patent claims a reduction in the amount of the data stored in new blocks as transactions mount in a blockchain while ensuring that data from all previous transactions will still be tamper-proof and traceable.

At the moment, the patent in the review process.